Broadcom to buy VMware in $61 billion acquisition

bink

[H]ard|Gawd
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We had our monthly meeting with our dell rep and they claim business as usual with VMware and that they are running it as a separate company. I don't believe that but we will see.

We also have some production KVM / ovirt. I hope the veeam rhev backup tool that's in beta takes off. I would be more inclined to move our compute to KVM. anyone who thinks kvm is more feature rich than vmware is....wrong.
 

pillagenburn

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 3, 2006
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We had our monthly meeting with our dell rep and they claim business as usual with VMware and that they are running it as a separate company. I don't believe that but we will see.

We also have some production KVM / ovirt. I hope the veeam rhev backup tool that's in beta takes off. I would be more inclined to move our compute to KVM. anyone who thinks kvm is more feature rich than vmware is....wrong.

Im looking for a free alternative to vmware right now.... Need something with comparable features and performance.....
 

D-EJ915

[H]ard|Gawd
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Well, maybe if your annual bill for VMware is in the hundreds of millions (which isn't hard to imagine with VMware pricing). I'd say your statement is "false". Lots of business either went to cloud (which is bigger than big on virtualization and doesn't run on VMware) or moved to something KVM based or Xen based. While, my company did move from a community hypervisor to VMware, but not nearly to the same scale... well, because it's just that high priced (who cares about scale if it's unaffordable). Longer term, we're pushing everything into "the cloud".

Finally ready to throw out xenserver in the garbage where it belongs here when we get our hw refresh soon lol.
 

Fenris_Ulf

[H]ard|Gawd
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We had our monthly meeting with our dell rep and they claim business as usual with VMware and that they are running it as a separate company. I don't believe that but we will see.
As someone who used to work for Dell, it's absolutely true. Dell had partial (81%) ownership of VMWare until November, when it spun it off as an independent company. Based on how long it took my company to separate from Dell, it's probably going to take 6 months for the acquisition to become final.
 

Lakados

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Im looking for a free alternative to vmware right now.... Need something with comparable features and performance.....
Which features, VMWare has features that nobody else does but you are unlikely using them all. I’ve tried as well and used some alternatives, I’m moving back to VMWare for my next refresh.
 

pillagenburn

[H]ard|Gawd
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Which features, VMWare has features that nobody else does but you are unlikely using them all. I’ve tried as well and used some alternatives, I’m moving back to VMWare for my next refresh.
over-committing resources is one thing for sure... not sure of anyone else that does this really.
 

Sycraft

Supreme [H]ardness
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Speaking of mining for trade secrets - any idea if other cloud-based services do the same or know of specific instances where services have been caught doing this? Salesforce comes to mind.
I've never heard of a case of corporate espionage that was proven but it is something I'd always be suspicious of, particularly if you are in an area that competes with one of their segments or if you are doing something they might be interested in. As Lakados said, you CAN keep it from happening, it is possible to encrypt everything with keys only you have. However that does take effort, planning, and management on the part of the company doing that since you have to manage all your own keys. I think many companies are not good at that, since part of the reason they want to shovel everything to the cloud is to not have to deal with things, and likewise even if they could they might not as if you really have done it properly there is NO recovery if you lose your keys. The only way for a provider to be truly locked out from your data is if the encryption is such they have no recovery mechanism.

Also that only really applies if your data is something that isn't processed on their servers. If you store your data with a provider encrypted, and transfer it to your site encrypted, and only then decrypt it and work on it then there is no way they could steal your data, they would have no access provided you guard your keys. However if you run programs on their servers? Ya they can get it, even if you have all the encryption keys because the servers themselves, the Hypervisor, has to be able to decrypt things. There are ways to try and isolate things so that someone there can't do that but it relies on them to implement it right. Also it is imperfect, as companies have found out trying to stop software piracy: If the decryption key is on the system, someone with admin access to that system can get it.

Really when you hand your data, your money, your anything over to a company for safe keeping you have to trust that company to not misuse it. So I find my bank trustworthy in part because the amount of money I have isn't worth their while to misuse, in part because they have a history of being honest, and in part because there are strong federal laws and regulations that would likely refund me if they did. I wouldn't trust Amazon so much with corporate data in part because there really isn't as much of a legal framework dealing with it and in part because they haven't proven themselves to be a particularly ethical company.
 

Lakados

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over-committing resources is one thing for sure... not sure of anyone else that does this really.
Over-commitment is a tough one, Hyper-V can do it if you are careful with your use of Dynamic Memory and priority assignments, but VMWare manages that in an easier more automated way for sure.
 

lopoetve

Extremely [H]
Joined
Oct 11, 2001
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The free hypervisor in Linux (kvm) supports cpu and memory over commit for certain.
Only in the latest release, and with significant performance degradation if using more than one vCPU on your guests. VMkernel scheduler is far better at handling that (we aim for a 6:1 - 8:1 ratio, as long as you have pCPU > maximum vCPU of your largest guest) and always has been.

Memory sure - but CPU scheduling has always been the hard part there. That's all protected by a giant pile of patents/etc.
 
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