BioStar has its AMD Ryzen AM4 Motherboards Listed for Now

FrgMstr

Just Plain Mean
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BioStar is ahead of the pack when it comes to talking Ryzen AM4 motherboards, so I am unsure whether or not these pages will remain live for long. BioStar has three of its X370 chipset motherboards listed on its site; X370GT7 Ver. 5.x, X370GT5 Ver. 5.x, X370GT3 Ver. 6.x. It also has two of its B350 chipset boards listed: B350GT5 Ver. 5.x, B350GT3 Ver. 6.x. The differences between the models are subtle at best, however audio is the "biggest" difference as well as what onboard video outputs are supported.

AMD's new AM4 platform will accompany Ryzen. It brings all of the new tech that you'd expect, including DDR4 RAM, PCI-E Gen 3, USB 3.1 Gen 2, NVMe and SATA Express. AMD X370 is the high-end chipset for overclockers and tweakers who need robust platforms. This chip provides the ultimate low-level control to its users and delivers ultimate graphics card bandwidth.
 
Why do you think the mobo revision is already at like 5? Most companies reach, say, 2 or 3 only after a few years had passed.
Does this mean they've been sitting on them for quite a long time, or is this a Biostar thing?
 
looks like its by cpu?
INTEGRATED VIDEO By CPU model
Supports DX12
Supports HDCP
 
Yeesh, with all the hype they're getting, AMD better deliver.

Why do you think the mobo revision is already at like 5? Most companies reach, say, 2 or 3 only after a few years had passed.
Does this mean they've been sitting on them for quite a long time, or is this a Biostar thing?
I've owned a few Biostar boards, and higher board revision numbers are not unusual for them.
 
I saw these models listed yesterday. I was going to get the MSI B350 because of the legacy PCI (older soundcards) but seeing how Biostar has it on the X370GT5, that is where my money is going.
 
After moving to AM3+ with black sockets I hate the look of the white again and wouldn't buy it for that reason alone.
 
After the experiences I've had with Biostar Motherboards, I consider them dead last on th elist of Motherboard brands I would consider putting in any of my rigs.
 
After moving to AM3+ with black sockets I hate the look of the white again and wouldn't buy it for that reason alone.

The socket that you can't see once a CPU and cooler are installed? I guess if it bothers you that much for the five minutes you'll see it.
 
The placement of the m2 is decidedly better than Asus' placement next to dram at the cost of two dram slots on the Apex board. (y)
 
Will AMD ever stop putting the pins on the CPU and on the motherboard instead?
 
Will AMD ever stop putting the pins on the CPU and on the motherboard instead?

What was the reason for it in the first place, other than to be different from Intel?
 
Intel has had chips with pins as well, it's just been a while. They made the move to different packaging, AMD has not.
 
What was the reason for it in the first place, other than to be different from Intel?

Lol. Yeah, until Bloomfield (I think) in 2008, 100% of all CPU's ever had pins.

I've had these Pentiums on a shelf next to my desk for old times sake for a while.

upload_2017-2-20_16-14-7.png


(and yes, they have bent pins, but they have been kicking around various shelves and boxes since th elate 90's when I stopped using them :p )

I thought it was really weird when I first got my i7-920 and it didn't have pins.

Personally pins don't bother me. I've been using them for 25 years, and I don't recall ever bending or breaking one, and if you do it seems easier to straighten one than it is to fix a damaged motherboard pin. I don't understand what the fuss is all about.

As long as you just seat the processor into the socket under its own weight, and don't apply force, you should never have a problem.


edit:

My bad, the pinless CPU's started with LGA775 in the Pentium 4 days apparently. I just never discovered it until I built my i7-920 in 2009.

I had Intel chips up until the launch of AMD's K7, at which point I used nothing but AMD until I got my i7-920, so I never realized the switch had happened before that.
 
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Lol. Yeah, until Bloomfield (I think) in 2008, 100% of all CPU's ever had pins.

I thought it was really weird when I first got my i7-920 and it didn't have pins.

Personally pins don't bother me. I've been using them for 25 years, and I don't recall ever bending or breaking one, and if you do it seems easier to straighten one than it is to fix a damaged motherboard ping. I don't understand what the fuss is all about.

As long as you just seat the processor into the socket under its own weight, and don't apply force, you should never have a problem

All this
 
It's all preference.

Doesn't look like anyone is fussing honestly, it was just my personal preference.

Pins, zomg. Let's nitpick now?

You can't say anything on forums now and days without getting a reply like this one here, I love it.
 
Biostar sucks. Only safe choice is asus.

Asrock is good but, for out of the gate stuff, Asus is probably safer. Asrock do produce good, solid day to day motherboards if you are not looking into heavy overclocking.
 
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Asrock is good but, for out of the gate stuff, Asus is probably safer. Asrock do produce good, solid day to day motherboards if you are not looking into heavy overclocking.

They are the same company though, aren't they?

My all time favorite was Abit, but since they are gone, I just have to settle...

I'd go with either Asus, MSI or Gigabyte these days. Asus probably have slightly better hardware quality than the other two, but their customer service usually isn't worth writing home about, if you ever have an issue.
 
did any of it have onboard graphics mentioned?

because the boards support the FM4 APU chips as well as the new ryzen processors and eventually the ryzen based APU's the boards won't have IGP's on them.

Biostar sucks. Only safe choice is asus.

10 years ago maybe, but the last 6-7 years biostar has gotten a lot better with their high end boards.


What was the reason for it in the first place, other than to be different from Intel?

probably because intel has a patent on it or some shit is my guess.

Why do you think the mobo revision is already at like 5? Most companies reach, say, 2 or 3 only after a few years had passed.
Does this mean they've been sitting on them for quite a long time, or is this a Biostar thing?

not sure but might vary between manufacture, the 3 biostar boards i have start with v6.x oldest board being 9 years old. while the 2 asus boards i have are v2.x. it could also be an internal thing to show high end vs mid vs low end or something instead of using the product name.
 
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Sure hope Biostar is better than I remember, because if they're the only ones putting out an X370 mATX board they will probably get my coinage.
 
I've only ever owned one Biostar motherboard but it's still kicking after 7 years. It's in my HTPC at the moment. I'd be open to them as a brand i'd buy.
 
Biostar? Aw hell no. That's as bad as ECS. Is ECS still around? (google says yes)
 
I cannot complain about Biostar. All 3 of the Biostar boards I have bought are still up and running. I cannot say that about ASUS motherboards. I have purchased 5 ASUS motherboards and only 1 is still running today.
 
I cannot complain about Biostar. All 3 of the Biostar boards I have bought are still up and running. I cannot say that about ASUS motherboards. I have purchased 5 ASUS motherboards and only 1 is still running today.

You've had 4 motherboards die on you?

In my 25+ years of this hobby I've never had a single motherboard from any vendor die on me.

I've just been very disappointed with Biostars implementations, lacking certain C states for no apparent reason, having poor bios fan control, poor overclocking, etc.
 
Biostar? Aw hell no. That's as bad as ECS. Is ECS still around? (google says yes)

I have to chime in here. I always thought biostar had a bad reputation but I am someone who buys whatever board is cheapest with my desired specs -- so ive owned multiple biostar 770/870 and a 990fx. All of them were solid and reliable. I tried ECS multiple times and each time was a disaster. Honestly ECS is the only manufacture ive had real problems with. If we bring support into the equation MSI is my #1 brand. They have replaced motherboards for me that I got on trade (freebies) no questions asked, no proof of purchase or anything... Ive been buying asrock boards since AGP days (I had a Nvidia 5900 AGP and wasn't ready to switch to PCI-e.) Asrock came to the rescue and made a board with both AGP / PCI-E for my new build at the time.
 
Biostar? Aw hell no. That's as bad as ECS. Is ECS still around? (google says yes)

ecs is still pretty trash, i only ever remember them releasing one good board back during the 939 socket days.. unlike biostar who has tried to fix their reputation ECS took hold of their terrible reputation and wears it like a badge of honor. but hey if fry's is still willing to sell their crap i guess there's no reason to change..
 
After the experiences I've had with Biostar Motherboards, I consider them dead last on th elist of Motherboard brands I would consider putting in any of my rigs.
That's odd--I've had 3 builds using a Biostar mobo, and none have failed. In fact, my AM2+ machine is still serving as my file server, some 10 years after I bought it.
 
They are the same company though, aren't they?

They are not the same company.

because the boards support the FM4 APU chips as well as the new ryzen processors and eventually the ryzen based APU's the boards won't have IGP's on them.



10 years ago maybe, but the last 6-7 years biostar has gotten a lot better with their high end boards.




probably because intel has a patent on it or some shit is my guess.



not sure but might vary between manufacture, the 3 biostar boards i have start with v6.x oldest board being 9 years old. while the 2 asus boards i have are v2.x. it could also be an internal thing to show high end vs mid vs low end or something instead of using the product name.

Intel stated that the move was to make CPU's more durable. CPU's typically cost much more than motherboards and they felt people would prefer to wreck a $300 motherboard than a $1,000 CPU. In truth I think it just shifted the manufacturing cost of the pin array from Intel to the motherboard maker and cut down on bent pins and warranty claims that they'd have to deal with.

Biostar? Aw hell no. That's as bad as ECS. Is ECS still around? (google says yes)

Biostar is not remotely fucking close to being as bad as ECS. The big problem with Biostar is it's minimal North American presence.
 
They are not the same company.

I could have sworn that ASRock was Asustek's low cost brand.

Hmm. Some googling suggests that was once the case, but it was years ago, and the brand was spun off to an independent company (Pegatron) in 2008.

Seems like just yesterday.
 
I was sort of hoping the "CPU Support" page would have leaked more interesting information about the CPU SKUs. Too bad.
 
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