best way to setup this office

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by SpeedSlayer, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. SpeedSlayer

    SpeedSlayer [H]ardness Supreme

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    Hey guys heres what I have and what has to be setup:

    600mhz, 256mb ram, 20gb for Windows/Programs and 80 GBs in Raid 1 (SERVER)
    2 Laptops
    4 Desktops

    I connect through Verizon Wireless (The new stuff, due to no dsl and no cable and satellite sucks)

    The way the diagram will be

    Internet -> Server -> 1 Laptop/Desktop Hardwired - the rest wireless

    I wanna know the best equipment to do a proper setup that wont crash.. I am currentyl just using a Wireless Router hooked up to the server and it works but crashs daily...

    Almost whats the best software to configure all of this stuff? Or just use Windows stuff?
     
  2. randyc

    randyc Best Person

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    It's not a real big network, so I'm sure that a consumer router would be fine.

    Perhaps the Linksys WRT54G?
    It's proven stable to me with stock firmware and so far is one of the best routers I've used.

    -randyc
     
  3. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat [H]ardForum Junkie

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    What OS is your "server"...if it's a real server OS, is it running active directory?
    What is the interface with the verizon wireless? Does it plug into a regular ethernet WAN port of any router? PPPoE driven?
     
  4. SpeedSlayer

    SpeedSlayer [H]ardness Supreme

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    OS: Windows 2000
    I call it a server, for lack of better terminology, but currently we are working on a very complex excel/vb/database program that will restructure the compay and will be ran of the main system

    Verizon Wireless is PCMCIA, and I got a PCI CARD that has the PCMCIA interface. I believe the card is WWAN
     
  5. HarvInSTL

    HarvInSTL Limp Gawd

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    You are talking about running a very complex excel/vb/database program on a 600Mhz machine w/ 256mb ram?

    Tell your boss to suck it up and by a single proc dell server w/ 512-1GB of ram. You could even use your current 80GB's in a software Raid 1 array.
    Since this is such a small office, toss SBS 2K3 on there, which comes with ISA and you can use that along with Routing & Remote Access for your NAT.

    As well make sure the wireless is setup to at a min. use WPA.
     
  6. SpeedSlayer

    SpeedSlayer [H]ardness Supreme

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    Trust me, the database will be capable. There is no justification to blow out $1k on SBS 2k3 for this business. And even if it isn't Ill slap a 1.8ghz comp laying around together..

    I just wanna know what the proper hardware i should use to do this properly


    Edit: Just cause its complex doesnt mean it can't be setup to run effiectenly.... The whole database will be small just structure of it is complex..
     
  7. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Is this "server" a true Server OS? Or a desktop OS?

    In other words...Windows 2000...but which one? Professional or Server? If server, running active directory? Or just in peer to peer mode? (obviously the latter if Win2Kpro)
     
  8. Party2go9820

    Party2go9820 2[H]4U

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    Doing it properly is a good idea, but if you're going to do it right, do it right. 2003 SBS on some server grade equipment (Either a dell server or something like an HP DL350)

    If the data is important (and I've never seen a server that had unimportant data) then you need to do it right - hardware, software, backup - the whole 9 yards.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. versello

    versello 2[H]4U

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    The guy said there's no reason to blow money on equipment when his current server can handle it. He has RAID 1 and I assume backups. That's all you really need, aside from some warranty.

    His OS is also fine. It does what he needs it to do, and any OS can be deemed a "server" OS.

    Like randyc mentioned, I'd get a small but proven router, like the WRT54g. It's probably best to offload any sort of internet traffic from your database server (or at least that's how I'm perceiving your current set up, based on your diagram).
     
  10. SpeedSlayer

    SpeedSlayer [H]ardness Supreme

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    Alright a little more info:

    Server, Laptop 1, Desktop 1, Printer 1 = Upstairs
    Laptop 2,3,4, Desktop 2,3,4, Printer 2 = Downstairs

    I just realized, all the people are going to end up having laptops (Pool Salesman) and desktops for the office..

    So here is what I was thinking:

    Server -> Switch 1 <- Desktop, Switch 2, Wireless Router
    Switch 2 -> Desktops 2-4
    Wireless Router -> Laptops 1-4 (Note: I will use MAC Addresses for extra secruity, on top of WEP and etc...

    Do you think this is a logical solution for Stability and Speed?
    Should I build another Server for the Database?
     
  11. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Still unanswered...when you say you have a "server"...is this Windows 2000 Server? Or Windows 2000 Professional that you sort of run as a little peer to peer server?

    I'd go with nice business grade router like a Linksys/Cisco RV082...that'll connect your wired workstations and this "server" fine...allow safe remote access to the LAN with its built in VPN server. Then sling a nice MIMO access point off of the router, like the Linksys WAP54gx. Screw old clunky outdated WEP security, WPA is easier to setup, and more secure.

    I'd give SBS2K3 a peek. This is a business afterall, and SBS has a lot of features designed to help businesses function smoother. E-Mail, collaboration, shared faxing, robust remote access features, etc. It's a really slick product.

    I'm not a fan of using desktop operating systems as "servers"..they're "OK" for small 2-3 node networks...but the closer you get to 10...you can get some wonky issues as you push the limits of a desktop OS.

    Same with desktop hardware running as a server....with a server, you want hardware that's designed to run 24/7 for over 3 years. Hard drives with MTBF (mean time between failures) that's MUCH higher than traditional desktop hardware. Hard drives that can handle concurrent hits (SCSI RULES)...the demands of feeding information to several or more clients at the same time. IDE/PATA, and even SATA don't match the performance of SCSI here. I don't believe in IDE hard drives in a server.