Best way to route ... HW vs SW

Troxx

n00b
Joined
Nov 24, 2006
Messages
21
I'm tired of not reaching my other computers on LAN. Problem is that 192.168.0.xxx is used, then my router in garage uses 192.168.1.xxx and I also have a wifi at 192.168.10.xxx....
My soution so far: buying more switches and set up routers as AP. Then I can manage to keep most to same 192.168.10.xxx

Hamachi will probably behave nice, but costs money and "installation"...

Better solutions?
 

cjcox

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2004
Messages
1,901
Considering everything is really sw, I'd say doing this with software is fine.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
978
I'm tired of not reaching my other computers on LAN. Problem is that 192.168.0.xxx is used, then my router in garage uses 192.168.1.xxx and I also have a wifi at 192.168.10.xxx....
My soution so far: buying more switches and set up routers as AP. Then I can manage to keep most to same 192.168.10.xxx

Hamachi will probably behave nice, but costs money and "installation"...

Better solutions?

Umm... this sounds messy. Got a map?
 

MrGuvernment

Fully [H]
Joined
Aug 3, 2004
Messages
19,936
Agree, Map? how are you doing DHCP for each range? Sounds like you have 3 separate networks. What you need is a router capable of doing VLANS if you want to separate networks for security reasons, if not for security then no reason to have 3 networks and just make 1 big one.
 

Troxx

n00b
Joined
Nov 24, 2006
Messages
21
Agree, Map? how are you doing DHCP for each range? Sounds like you have 3 separate networks. What you need is a router capable of doing VLANS if you want to separate networks for security reasons, if not for security then no reason to have 3 networks and just make 1 big one.

TV - via IP needs this router.
Could set up extra routers as AP, but I need more than their 4 switch ports...
1617318313798.png
 
Last edited:

MrGuvernment

Fully [H]
Joined
Aug 3, 2004
Messages
19,936
Do you "need" the separate subnets? Or are you fine with running everything off of 192.168.10.***/24?

if so just do as you noted, change the 192.168.10.156 router into AP mode, connect the router/AP via a LAN port into your main switch and it will pass your .10 range to devices.
 

scrappymouse

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
210
Are you defining these networks? Or are you just taking whatever network the router gives you? Where is your dhcp server? Do you have a dchp server for each network or are these VLANs and you've defined the scope off of a primary DHCP server?
 

Troxx

n00b
Joined
Nov 24, 2006
Messages
21
Are you defining these networks? Or are you just taking whatever network the router gives you? Where is your dhcp server? Do you have a dchp server for each network or are these VLANs and you've defined the scope off of a primary DHCP server?
ISP's router is set to be DHCP.
Each router is set to act as a router, I'll probably change them to act as AP's
TV-router has to be router ... if I change to AP TV get hiccups..
 

scrappymouse

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
210
ISP's router is set to be DHCP.
Each router is set to act as a router, I'll probably change them to act as AP's
TV-router has to be router ... if I change to AP TV get hiccups..
That's probably because of the rest of the network, your IP scheme is all messy and its probably getting confused, I'd set all the SSID and passwords the same on all routers, personally I'd set up the ISP modem in bridged mode and disable the wifi on it(unless you need it of course) and the router closest to ISP modem set it up as your DHCP server, set all other routers up as APs(including TV router,shouldn't hiccup if you're consistent), than clear ARP cache on your devices(reboot should work as well) and reboot everything and reconnect you devices back to the wifi, you can also control then DHCP scope better this way, I'd recommend choosing a network range you currently don't use so you can validate of if the devices are getting the correct IP from the correct device(router closest to ISP modem) set it to like 192.168.20.x or something you don't use
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Troxx
like this

scrappymouse

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
210
Changed that now.. I could imagine problems, but private IPs are probably easy to find, why is it a security risk?
https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/79583/an-attacker-has-my-ip-addressso-what
Public IPs are more of a security risk because you can get location information and there are online tools that can scan them to see if there are any vulnerabilities(aka weaknesses) that could allow them in, private IPs aren't as bad, because honestly they are defined ranges all ready, just less information is better
 
Top