Best Mechanical Keyboard, Money No Object?

dvsman

2[H]4U
Joined
Dec 2, 2009
Messages
3,612
I've used a Das Keyboard for my office keyboard for the past few years (10-12 hour days on the computer/typing) and definitely recommend that for typists / work. It has 2 usb 2.0 on the side that work fine in a pinch, for the random mice / jump drives. My only complaint is minor - the LED they use to light the caps / numlock above the number pad is very weak and barely legible in standard office lighting.

At home I'm using a Max Keyboard Nighthawk X8, also great. It has bright fixed single color backlighting, audio in and out and 2x US 2.0 as well (on the back side, facing away from the user, above the keypad).

I'm sure the newer, latest versions of either keyboard are still great.

Aside from that, I just ordered a Logitech G910 Orion Spectrum (from the Best Buy deal someone posted on here) to try out the Romer-G switches. This will be my first non-Cherry MX mechanical caps and switches, so curious to see what the differences might be.
 

Valnar

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 3, 2001
Messages
3,835
Pretty much everything bows down to a RealForce Topre keyboard IMO. I have a 45gr white/gray version that is discontinued, but the black version is still available.
 

jpsulisz

n00b
Joined
Nov 22, 2016
Messages
11
+1 more on the Corsair K70 RGB LUX, owned it since August and love it to death. The extra USB helps when I need one. Love the design and how many key switches are available.

Cons:
Corsair software profiles when switching versions of their Utility Engine.
The RGB's get a bad rap for being unreliable, or atleast they did, but I haven't any issues. (Take this into consideration if you wish).

Overall, I would buy it again, only if money was not an issue.
 

Mad Maxx

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Apr 12, 2016
Messages
6,177
Another vote for Corsair. Mine is the K65 RGB Rapidfire with Silver switches. Never thought I'd find a mech board I liked better than Deck, but this K65 is it. At $130, it ain't cheap, but definitely worth it.
 

jarablue

Gawd
Joined
May 31, 2003
Messages
994
I used to think the same about my K70, however after a few weeks it just looked like an oily mess. Great keyboard overall and the volume wheel was awesome, but I've since switched to more simplistic keyboards and couldn't be happier. I have a mouse button that mutes the sound :p That should change tomorrow when the autore with media macros comes in. I can't wait.

I have been using mine for awhile and never noticed any oil on my keys. Clean your hands ya oily stinker! ;)
 

workshop35

Gawd
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
742
If you really want the best keyboard *for you* and have unlimited funds, mechanical ability, and time, the best possible keyboard you can buy is hand built.

Second this. I'm finishing up the firmware on my second keyboard. I used my laser cutter to make the plates out of 1/8" baltic birch instead of metal though. Stained wood looks really nice plus I really like the sound it makes when the keys bottom out vs metal or plastic. It's well worth your time and effort to learn how to do this yourself.
 

CruisD64

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
2,308
I have been using mine for awhile and never noticed any oil on my keys. Clean your hands ya oily stinker! ;)

You know, I actually wash my hands all the time. I am naturally oily though. More than the average person. :) That being said, I'm not the only one who has thought that of their K70's. I still think they look great, but just not for me.

PS - My new Autore backlit came in and it's game over. I believe it is the best keyboard now. Paired with my brown Filco wrist rest it is just plain rad. Now you can pick the switch you want too. The backlit version can be either in blues or browns and the standard non backlit edition come in reds or browns. I will be writing a review on it most likely next week. I kinda want to start a Youtube channel for PC review stuff, but don't quote me on that. :p
 

ChoGGi

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 7, 2005
Messages
1,748
You know, I actually wash my hands all the time. I am naturally oily though. More than the average person.
Could be you wash too often and your body pumps out more oil to compensate, or your soap has a harsh degreaser in it?
 

CruisD64

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
2,308
Could be you wash too often and your body pumps out more oil to compensate, or your soap has a harsh degreaser in it?

Nope. Genetics. My dad and brother are the same way. Some people are just like that :)
 

gangolfus

Gawd
Joined
Aug 8, 2005
Messages
923
I used to think the same about my K70, however after a few weeks it just looked like an oily mess.

Most stock keycaps are made of ABS plastic which is prone to get oily and shiny fairly quickly. You could try some keycaps made of PBT plastic which is far less prone to getting oily/shiny. They too will eventually get oily, but it should take far longer.
 

Lunas

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 22, 2001
Messages
10,005
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...IN=B00MJ3M91E&linkCode=xm2&tag=thesteawork-20

there are other similar models that are both more and less expensive...

Most stock keycaps are made of ABS plastic which is prone to get oily and shiny fairly quickly. You could try some keycaps made of PBT plastic which is far less prone to getting oily/shiny. They too will eventually get oily, but it should take far longer.
Or he can get a full set of milled aluminum or titanium or zinc key caps
 
Last edited:

entropism

2[H]4U
Joined
Dec 23, 2004
Messages
3,640
Honestly, I would ask here:

https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyboards/

These people are ridiculous and obsessive, but they definitely give good advice.

Most stock keycaps are made of ABS plastic which is prone to get oily and shiny fairly quickly. You could try some keycaps made of PBT plastic which is far less prone to getting oily/shiny. They too will eventually get oily, but it should take far longer.

Yeah, definitely want to get doubleshot keys for this.
 

tungt88

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
2,099
I was originally going for a Topre keyboard, but decided on the Logitech G810 Orion Spectrum:

http://gaming.logitech.com/en-us/product/g810-orion-spectrum-rgb-gaming-keyboard

The Romer-G switches are considerably different from the Cherry, but they have the advantage of being a lot more quiet (they are in the same ballpark as the Cherry slient/Topre in that regard).

Of course, for the retro fanatics who want a quasi-typewriter experience, there's this:

https://www.massdrop.com/buy/azio-mk-retro-mechanical-typewriter-style-keyboard
and
https://www.amazon.com/Azio-Typewriter-Inspired-Mechanical-MK-RETRO-01/dp/B01LY32G54
 

ASCII

n00b
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
26
Poker with a weighty Hammer or FMJ case, Blue or Brown switches, GMK caps

Not the best for people who need a 10 key, but for all other purposes the 60% is superior in my opinion.

It will take some adjusting to get used to it, but once you grasp the layers your mouse will be free to roam.
 

vmaddogv

Weaksauce
Joined
Mar 9, 2005
Messages
79
Another vote for the Ducky keyboards (I like the simplistic design). The good news is that if you get one you do not like, there will be someone out there willing to buy it from you.
 

HeavensCloud

Oswego, not shitty as Buffalo
Joined
Feb 7, 2008
Messages
7,485
Just got the 2017 Feenix Autore from my mum for Christmas, damn it's a pretty board. Previously I was using an RGB Thermaltake with kailh brown switches that is great except for a squeak the space bar developed. Also have a TKL Leopold with reds that is build like a tank and perfect except for their funky sized keys that makes it more challenging to swap keycaps. Have a Roccat with blacks that I have never used because I don't have 35 pound fingers, but seems to be a very well made board besides that.

Final thoughts to OP's question. I think the best board for you would be determined by personal taste. Obviously building a board is going to be the best way, but many people including myself just don't have time for that. Start by determining your favorite switch, that's by far the most important and not all boards offer all switch types. Then decide what size board you want, whether you want macro keys, RGB lighting, board and keycap material, etc.
 

Falkentyne

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 19, 2000
Messages
1,823
The Ducky Shine 6 and Year of the Monkey are excellent boards. The MX blues are mostly consistent on my YOTM, and the LED processing quality is much improved from the shine 5. The RGB color fade to off is now virtually seamless and keeps the color accurate all the way to it shutting off (in reactive mode advanced, and Raindrop RGB mode). Most people would probably not have noticed that, but that's a very huge quality improvement. The Shine 5/YOTG one had the RGB channels fade simultaneously instead of adjusting for differences in RGB channel values, which would cause a mixed color (like Emerald, for example) to fade to green and then to off, or Violet to fade to blue then to off. I'm not sure how Corsair's Strafe and RGB Lux handle this, but just the LED quality fixes make the new Duckies worth it, even if you have a Shine 5 already.

Just be prepared to swap the keycaps out with something decent; the seamless YOTM keycaps, while the legends look nice with the LED's off, have the light partially blocked on enclosed legends (like 9, 0, D, 8, etc) as that was how they made it seamless. So you're either going to have to use the floating (non seamless) keys, or swap them to something else (I used the YOTG keycap set on my YOTM).
 

Quickstrike

Weaksauce
Joined
Nov 25, 2009
Messages
71
Corsair K70 LUX w/ Brown Cherry Switches

I bought the old non-LUX K70 version for my dad last winter, with Blue Cherry Switches.
Really liked that keyboard when I tested it out, so I decided to buy one for myself when it was $60 off on NewEgg.

After reading up about it, and testing it out myself, I think the Brown switches work better for me [I do mixed typing + gaming, whereas my father only types on his keyboard].

Really happy with my purchase.

Before this, I would often use the Microsoft Ergonomic/Curved Keyboards. As long as I have a somewhat decent palm rest [like with the K70], I have no need for a non-flat keyboard.
 

skeeder

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 9, 2004
Messages
1,315
Corsair K70 LUX w/ Brown Cherry Switches
Before this, I would often use the Microsoft Ergonomic/Curved Keyboards. As long as I have a somewhat decent palm rest [like with the K70], I have no need for a non-flat keyboard.

Hear hear! I recently switched from an ERGO (which I've been using for 14 years) to a mechanical keyboard. The difference is night and day. I'm on MX Browns right now and I love the feel of the keyboard when typing.

I wish I could give them all a try, but I feel like the browns offer the most "middle ground" than the blues or reds.
 

SPARTAN VI

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
8,358
If this is your first mechanical keyboard, I'd start with a mechanical switch tester, and maybe try to find some topre switches to test too. Find the type of switch you like first, then shop for that switch in the form factor the suits you (e.g. 60%, TKL/80%, full-sized, macro keys, etc.). If a tester doesn't appeal to you, then maybe swing by a brick and mortar store that has mechanical keyboards on display (e.g. MicroCenter). Don't want to test different switches? Then Cherry MX Browns are probably the safest best; they've got a small tactile bump and aren't over the top loud like Blues and Greens.

The market has really blown up over the past few years, so we have a bunch of alternatives to Cherry MX switches, some are knock-offs, and some that many would consider better (e.g. Topre). If money is no object, I'd go straight to Topre Realforce RGB, as this switch provides great audible and perfect tactile feedback, IMO. If topre isn't your thing, then I'd consider a Corsair K65 RGB or K70 RGB (I believe the Lux trim is largely the same, just different keycaps). I have the K65 RGB with Cherry MX Reds and other than its aesthetic, my favorite feature is that its flush design allows for easier cleaning than many standard keyboards with recessed switches.
 

skeeder

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 9, 2004
Messages
1,315
I like the K70 or K95 platinum with RGB. $199.99 is the price....ouchy.
 

jarablue

Gawd
Joined
May 31, 2003
Messages
994
I just downloaded the profile called Pulse Remnants for the K70 Lux. It is low lit but just nice. In my man cave, with the lights low surfing the web and playing games...mmm. I am such a fucking dork. ;)
 

Dan_D

Extremely [H]
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Messages
60,421
Pretty much everything bows down to a RealForce Topre keyboard IMO. I have a 45gr white/gray version that is discontinued, but the black version is still available.

I couldn't disagree more. I think the Topre Realforce switch is the most overrated design on the market today.

I've got one and it sucks compared to a real mechanical keyboard. The problem with the Topre switch is that it's a hybrid of the two types. A hybrid approach isn't a good thing when one of the products the hybrid is based on sucks. Membrane keyboards have two advantages over mechanical keyboards. Cost and spill resistance. The Topre keyboards cost more than most mechanical keyboards do which makes no sense. The second problem with the Topre switch is that the spill resistance of the membrane is lost because there isn't a full membrane to protect the PCB and electrical contacts below it. Essentially, the Topre switch's hybrid approach is built backwards from how it would have to be in order to retain this advantage. The membrane keyboard also has several disadvantages. Some of which the Topre switch inherits. Membrane keyboards offer a significantly worse typing experience. I realize this is subjective but this is my take on it. The Topre switch is still built in such a way as to have a better feel than that of a pure membrane keyboard but side by side I don't think it matches a good mechanical keyboard. The next disadvantage of a membrane is longevity. Membranes last between 10 and 30 million keystrokes which is one fifth the duration of a Cherry MX switch. There are mechanical switches that have a life span of 70 million keystrokes. Given that the Topre switch uses rubber domes at the top of the switch, they certainly won't last as long as a pure mechanical switch. They do have greater longevity than even a quality membrane unit I'm sure.

Quality mechanical keyboards should provide a smooth, consistent and crisp typing experience with less actuation resistance than that of a membrane keyboard. The Topre doesn't lose out much comparatively in the pure feel of it. In fact they feel like a mechanical with O-rings installed on them. But that mush at the end of the keystroke is one of the things I do not like about a membrane keyboard. Overtime I have to imagine that a Topre keyboard will lose some of its consistency as the rubber wears out.

I wouldn't hate Topre based keyboards as much as I do if it weren't for their insanely high prices. Topre keyboards typically start close to $150 or so and hit $200 or close to it very easily. Most mechanical keyboards are below the $150 mark with few exceptions such as Corsair's K95 RGB. I do appreciate the fact that Topre keyboards don't normally have volume controls and other bullshit. They typically cater to the minimalist and the professional typist. This is appealing to me but unfortunately, even after using one of these keyboards for a considerable amount of time I never warmed up to the feel of them. They feel somewhat like something between a Cherry MX Red and an Cherry MX Black switch with O-rings installed on them. That might be what some people are after, but the rubber O-ring or rubber dome defeats the purpose of having a mechanical keyboard to some degree.

I picked up a Logitech 710+ (MX Browns) on Black Friday for $60, well worth it for a starter board. For "money no object" best? Most would say Topre. Heck, most say Cherry aren't the best switches anymore, Gateron is actually a knockoff but "better". Personally? I'd probably pick this up and be done with it - https://mechanicalkeyboards.com/shop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=2129

I don't know that "most" would say Topre at all. I can't be the only one who thinks a hybrid approach with a shit technology that was designed to be bargain basement cheap to produce is retarded. In any case few people are willing to shell out the cash for a Topre even if the switch appeals to them. They are crazy expensive and really don't justify it in any way. AS for the Ducky Shine 6 special edition, I thought about buying one. I felt it was too expensive for not coming with PBT keycaps and I hated the "ribbed" look it has on the top of it. That one also only seems to come with Cherry MX Brown switches, which is not what I prefer. I'm not a fan of the extra media keys either, although I could live with those as they match the regular keyboard keys. I've got a Ducky Shine Zero as it is and I like it quite a bit. I don't feel like it's worth the price, even if it had my preferred switches.

The Ducky Shine 6 and Year of the Monkey are excellent boards. The MX blues are mostly consistent on my YOTM, and the LED processing quality is much improved from the shine 5. The RGB color fade to off is now virtually seamless and keeps the color accurate all the way to it shutting off (in reactive mode advanced, and Raindrop RGB mode). Most people would probably not have noticed that, but that's a very huge quality improvement. The Shine 5/YOTG one had the RGB channels fade simultaneously instead of adjusting for differences in RGB channel values, which would cause a mixed color (like Emerald, for example) to fade to green and then to off, or Violet to fade to blue then to off. I'm not sure how Corsair's Strafe and RGB Lux handle this, but just the LED quality fixes make the new Duckies worth it, even if you have a Shine 5 already.

Just be prepared to swap the keycaps out with something decent; the seamless YOTM keycaps, while the legends look nice with the LED's off, have the light partially blocked on enclosed legends (like 9, 0, D, 8, etc) as that was how they made it seamless. So you're either going to have to use the floating (non seamless) keys, or swap them to something else (I used the YOTG keycap set on my YOTM).

I haven't tried any RGB keyboards myself so I can't comment too much on that. Lighting is something I do like in modern mechanical keyboards and I've tried many backlit models over the years. The Corsair and sadly the Razer keyboards seem to handle lighting better than most. The key cap lighting on these is very even. Other units like my Ducky Shine Zero have keys that appear brighter than others for some reason. From what little I've seen of the Corsair RGB line, they seem to handle their lighting well. The build quality on Corsair keyboards is also exceptional given their mass produced nature and their price point. There are more expensive models out there which aren't built as well.
 

Valnar

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 3, 2001
Messages
3,835
Wow, necrothread.

Still loving my Topre keyboard. Sorry Dan, but I disagree with everything you said. I'd take my smooth 45gr Topre keys over the equivalent Cherry Red/Browns any day. The Blues are nice but too loud. My next closest keyboard that I sometimes use is a custom Keycool 87 with modified Cherry MX Clears. I swapped the springs for the Originative 65gr springs (discontinued) which places them slightly above Cherry Reds in actuation & weight.
 
F

Findecanor

Guest
I'm not sure what the "hybrid" aspect of Topre switches are supposed to be, but. Yes, they are the most high-quality rubber dome keyboard there is.
Rubber dome/membrane keyboards tend to fail on the electrical contacts on the plastic membrane sheets - not the rubber. Some rubber dome keyboards tend to become mushier with age though, while other do not (for instance a Key Tronic ErgoForce made 20 years ago is still as snappy today).

What you pay for with Topre Realforce is the "Made in Japan": sticker and attention to quality in every part. There is no need to replace or mod any part of it, except maybe replace the Space Bar with one of PBT.

Myself I have a Topre Realforce variable and a Cooler Master Novatouch (45g). The latter is overrated, yes and also discontinued now after poor sales
- Cooler Master did not have attention to detail, they erred in thinking that getting the switches would be enough.
However, I don't use them, as tend to find the switches fatiguing compared to Cherry MX Blue and Clear.

As to answering the question in the original post, if money is no object:
Get a VE.A kit, purple Zealio switches and Zealencio silencing clips.
The keyboard has a case of anodized aluminium (milled, not the internal sheet metal mounting plate bent to become the top, like on Corsair's and Razer's), a light-up LED stripe and is split in two parts (but does not have to be).
The switches are similar to the modified switches Valnar mentioned above but smoother and the clips should be compatible with the VE.A - silencing both the downstroke and upstroke.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

BottomsUp

Gawd
Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
602
I got a K70 Lux RGB this week. it's great. i can't believe i'm using a loud mechanical keyboard after 20 years and doing it for gaming to boot. I feel like a man child
 

Dan_D

Extremely [H]
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Messages
60,421
I'm not sure what the "hybrid" aspect of Topre switches are supposed to be, but. Yes, they are the most high-quality rubber dome keyboard there is.
Rubber dome/membrane keyboards tend to fail on the electrical contacts on the plastic membrane sheets - not the rubber. Some rubber dome keyboards tend to become mushier with age though, while other do not (for instance a Key Tronic ErgoForce made 20 years ago is still as snappy today).

What you pay for with Topre Realforce is the "Made in Japan": sticker and attention to quality in every part. There is no need to replace or mod any part of it, except maybe replace the Space Bar with one of PBT.

Myself I have a Topre Realforce variable and a Cooler Master Novatouch (45g). The latter is overrated, yes and also discontinued now after poor sales
- Cooler Master did not have attention to detail, they erred in thinking that getting the switches would be enough.
However, I don't use them, as tend to find the switches fatiguing compared to Cherry MX Blue and Clear.

As to answering the question in the original post, if money is no object:
Get a VE.A kit, purple Zealio switches and Zealencio silencing clips.
The keyboard has a case of anodized aluminium (milled, not bent sheet-metal like Corsair's and Razer's), a light-up LED stripe and is split in two parts (but does not have to be).
The switches are similar to the modified switches Valnar mentioned above but smoother, and the clips should be compatible with the VE.A - silencing both the downstroke and upstroke.

I have no desire to silence my keyboard switches at all. It's not that I mind the silence, but rather that the methods used to silence the key switches add mush to the feel of the switch. O-rings for example make the key switch feel like a Topre which feels like membrane based key switch. No thanks.

I got a K70 Lux RGB this week. it's great. i can't believe i'm using a loud mechanical keyboard after 20 years and doing it for gaming to boot. I feel like a man child

Which key switches did you get? In any case, there is no difference in gaming with any keyboard membrane or otherwise. The only issue some people have is that clicky type switches like the Cherry MX Blues make extra noise that's not desirable while gaming. I just tune it out so the sound of Cherry MX Blues does not bother me.
 
F

Findecanor

Guest
t's not that I mind the silence, but rather that the methods used to silence the key switches add mush to the feel of the switch. O-rings for example make the key switch feel like a Topre which feels like membrane based key switch. No thanks.
I find that the impact is different for different switches and different typing styles. I use O-rings on clicky switches because the audial click is feedback that the switch has actuated - hearing click and then sometimes a clack messes that up.
MX Clear switches you don't press them down to the bottom as much, and so on them silencing is not as much needed, nor is it perceived that much.

You should also get as thin O-rings as possible that work. With some aftermarket keycaps in Cherry's original profile - which are lower than the current norm - you would want to use orthodonic rubber bands instead - those are very very thin.
The silencing clips I mentioned dampen also the sound of the key on the rebound but ... they were made for Cherry profile, they are compatible only with very few keyboards and they are very expensive in comparison to O-rings.
 

Zarathustra[H]

Extremely [H]
Joined
Oct 29, 2000
Messages
34,073
I couldn't disagree more. I think the Topre Realforce switch is the most overrated design on the market today.

I've got one and it sucks compared to a real mechanical keyboard. The problem with the Topre switch is that it's a hybrid of the two types. A hybrid approach isn't a good thing when one of the products the hybrid is based on sucks. Membrane keyboards have two advantages over mechanical keyboards. Cost and spill resistance. The Topre keyboards cost more than most mechanical keyboards do which makes no sense. The second problem with the Topre switch is that the spill resistance of the membrane is lost because there isn't a full membrane to protect the PCB and electrical contacts below it. Essentially, the Topre switch's hybrid approach is built backwards from how it would have to be in order to retain this advantage. The membrane keyboard also has several disadvantages. Some of which the Topre switch inherits. Membrane keyboards offer a significantly worse typing experience. I realize this is subjective but this is my take on it. The Topre switch is still built in such a way as to have a better feel than that of a pure membrane keyboard but side by side I don't think it matches a good mechanical keyboard. The next disadvantage of a membrane is longevity. Membranes last between 10 and 30 million keystrokes which is one fifth the duration of a Cherry MX switch. There are mechanical switches that have a life span of 70 million keystrokes. Given that the Topre switch uses rubber domes at the top of the switch, they certainly won't last as long as a pure mechanical switch. They do have greater longevity than even a quality membrane unit I'm sure.

Quality mechanical keyboards should provide a smooth, consistent and crisp typing experience with less actuation resistance than that of a membrane keyboard. The Topre doesn't lose out much comparatively in the pure feel of it. In fact they feel like a mechanical with O-rings installed on them. But that mush at the end of the keystroke is one of the things I do not like about a membrane keyboard. Overtime I have to imagine that a Topre keyboard will lose some of its consistency as the rubber wears out.

I wouldn't hate Topre based keyboards as much as I do if it weren't for their insanely high prices. Topre keyboards typically start close to $150 or so and hit $200 or close to it very easily. Most mechanical keyboards are below the $150 mark with few exceptions such as Corsair's K95 RGB. I do appreciate the fact that Topre keyboards don't normally have volume controls and other bullshit. They typically cater to the minimalist and the professional typist. This is appealing to me but unfortunately, even after using one of these keyboards for a considerable amount of time I never warmed up to the feel of them. They feel somewhat like something between a Cherry MX Red and an Cherry MX Black switch with O-rings installed on them. That might be what some people are after, but the rubber O-ring or rubber dome defeats the purpose of having a mechanical keyboard to some degree.



I don't know that "most" would say Topre at all. I can't be the only one who thinks a hybrid approach with a shit technology that was designed to be bargain basement cheap to produce is retarded. In any case few people are willing to shell out the cash for a Topre even if the switch appeals to them. They are crazy expensive and really don't justify it in any way. AS for the Ducky Shine 6 special edition, I thought about buying one. I felt it was too expensive for not coming with PBT keycaps and I hated the "ribbed" look it has on the top of it. That one also only seems to come with Cherry MX Brown switches, which is not what I prefer. I'm not a fan of the extra media keys either, although I could live with those as they match the regular keyboard keys. I've got a Ducky Shine Zero as it is and I like it quite a bit. I don't feel like it's worth the price, even if it had my preferred switches.



I haven't tried any RGB keyboards myself so I can't comment too much on that. Lighting is something I do like in modern mechanical keyboards and I've tried many backlit models over the years. The Corsair and sadly the Razer keyboards seem to handle lighting better than most. The key cap lighting on these is very even. Other units like my Ducky Shine Zero have keys that appear brighter than others for some reason. From what little I've seen of the Corsair RGB line, they seem to handle their lighting well. The build quality on Corsair keyboards is also exceptional given their mass produced nature and their price point. There are more expensive models out there which aren't built as well.


I've never tried a Topre keyboard.

When it comes to Keyboard switches, I feel like there really is no "best", it's really just a matter of preference.

Personally, no keyboard I have ever used has felt better than the good old IBM Model M. From what I've heard I may actually prefer the switch feel of the older buckling spring's in the Model F's but those are about as rare as unicorn farts, so I have never actually typed on one.

Model M's have their drawbacks though, lacking NKRO, most of them (Except for the rare black M13 Trackpoint II model) are that awful communist beige/grey color, and no other advanced features, and they lack Windows keys.

Unicomps modern versions add USB and Windows keys, come in black with grey keys, but still no NKRO, no backlighting, etc.

If I had to visualize my ideal keyboard it would be a modern re-engineering of the buckling spring keyboard, based around Model M (or possibly Model F) keyswitches, but with a modern industrial design, double shot black keys, adjustable backlighting (I like a very very dim backlight, just so you can barely see it) NKRO, etc.

I feel like if Unicomp did this. or if they partnered with someone to do it, it could be the keyboard to end all keyboards. Every day that goes by and this doesn't exist yet, feels like a missed opportunity.

Personally, I will never again buy a rubber dome keybaord, and I really have no interest in anything with Cherry, Topre, Alps or any of these other newfangled switches, especially once mutilated by manufacturers that emphasize appearance over key-feel, and design long, or otherwise misshapen keycaps with unnatural keypress motion.

Until something changes, I guess I'll just stick with Unicomps designs, and keep on hoping for a modern refreshed version.
 
Top