ATT U-verse guy showed up

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Comixbooks, Dec 18, 2013.

  1. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    ATT uverse


    With a 6 meg connection we I'm only getting 700kbs average in steam peaks at like 1.2 but it's rare....both wired and wireless


    from 156k though thank god we didn't get the bigger package I haven't tested the connection on any other site though.

    Had to drill a hole in the wall myself with a 1/2 inch drill bit to get the cable though the way.

    The kid setup the router and modem in a different room too.

    One of the laptops he set up doesn't work now. Not sure if I should do a fresh install of windows 7 on it cause it's vista and has lots of bugs.
     
  2. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    Would different cables make a difference I have Belkin cables.....right now he did some work outside not sure what he all did.
     
  3. rflcptr

    rflcptr [H]ardness Supreme

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    what is your measured performance when wired directly to the modem?
     
  4. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    it was like 5.6 megs or something not sure how to check it speed test or something I haven't played around with the ATT site
     
  5. rflcptr

    rflcptr [H]ardness Supreme

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    all things being equal, if you're predictably getting 5.6 mbp/s of 6.0 mbp/s in that situation, the router is probably culprit.
     
  6. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    Yeah he just installed a new Belkin router with the ATT modem

    I think
     
  7. dbwillis

    dbwillis [H]ardness Supreme

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    try the test, speedtest.espn.com
     
  8. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    No I guess the Belkin thing is a battery backup thing....
     
  9. dbwillis

    dbwillis [H]ardness Supreme

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    its a battery backup yes, do you have phone service through uVerse?
     
  10. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    I get 3.42 download on the ESPN
     
  11. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    yeah so that is for phone ok...
     
  12. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    If I get a headache and brain fog from this thing I'm going to be pissed.

    Tons of complaints on the net about it...
     
  13. Cmustang87

    Cmustang87 [H]ardness Supreme

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    Use ispgeeks for your speed test. Run the capacity test.
     
  14. Mister Natural

    Mister Natural 2[H]4U

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    Are you using a modem and a router, or the Uverse gateway by itself?

    If you live in an old neighborhood with crappy phone lines your performance can also be affected
     
  15. dbwillis

    dbwillis [H]ardness Supreme

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    Uverse guy should run a new line from the pole to the house, if asked (he did for me..my line was 'unrated' he said)
    Belkin battery unit is for if you have a phone (911, etc)
    If you plan to use your own router/firewall, look into the DMZPLus mode, its easy to setup, it makes the uverse gateway run as a plain ole modem
     
  16. Dogs

    Dogs [H]ard|Gawd

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    The answer here is math.

    You're getting 5.6 megabits/second. Steam measures download speed in terms of bytes, not bits. There are 8 bits in a byte, so 5.6 megabits per second / 8 bits per byte = 0.7 megabytes per second, so 700 kB/s makes complete sense.
     
  17. Mopower

    Mopower Gawd

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    This. Lots of "problems" can be fixed by doing the correct conversions and knowing something about networking.
     
  18. schizrade

    schizrade [H]ardness Supreme

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    lol.

    Math.
     
  19. TCM2

    TCM2 Gawd

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    Yeah, with all the nonsense like "kbs", "kbp/s", "megs" or leaving out the units entirely, it's really hard to figure out what people actually mean and whether they even know what they mean.

    Just to be clear on one thing, though: signal speeds in bits per second are and always have been in base-10. This stems from the relation to signal bandwidths which are also base-10 and measured in Hz, kHz etc. So 5.6Mbps is really 5600000 bits per second, which is "0.667572021484375 MB/s". Yeah, rounding gets you to 0.7 MB/s as well, I just wanted to make the distinction clear.

    My habit is to denote signal speeds in bits per second as "bps", i.e. kbps, Mbps, Gbps. The small k denotes base-10. Data transfer speeds would then be B/s, KB/s, MB/s. Note the upper-case K meaning base-2, i.e. 1 KB/s = 1024 B/s. This is what computers show you in applications and hence is in base-2. If you are into SI nonsense, those would be called KiB/s, MiB/s.

    Summary: Mind your damn units, and case matters.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2013
  20. Liger88

    Liger88 2[H]4U

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    With regards to hard drives that is correct, but I'm not too sure that is the same with Internet speeds. Hard drive manufacturers sell something as 1GB (or 1 billion bytes) when in reality 1 billion bytes does not equal a base 2 gigabyte. Compared to RAM which actually denotes the base 2 system where every 1KB of RAM is equal to 1024 bytes.

    If an ISP sells you 1Mbps (1,000,000 bits per second) they are literally telling you they are selling you bits not bytes like hard drives. Hence dividing the bits advertised by the bytes (8) gives you the actual theoretical bandwidth. However, if the operating system recognizes transfer speeds using base 10 unlike storage which is seen using base 2, then I can see the discrepancy. I do know Microsoft was actually right the way they used base 2 showing you the actual storage (unlike Mac OSX which shows 1,000,000,000,000 bytes as 1TB) and it would seem odd if they backtracked when it came to transfer speeds by using base 10.

    Maybe someone else can clarify or add there input.
     
  21. TCM2

    TCM2 Gawd

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  22. bds1904

    bds1904 Gawd

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    AT&T U-Verse IPDSL 6Mbps service (service with modem NVG510 or 2210) MAX Sync rate is 6048Kbps. That will give you a maximum of 756KB/s download rate. Typically you will see about 720KB/s.

    If your modem is syncing at 5800Kbps then you are on an interleaved profile because of your distance from the DSLAM and you will see about 690KB/s download rate. Your sync rate can be checked at "http://192.168.1.254" by looking through the connection diagnostics.

    The U-Verse VDSL product (3800, 3801, 3600, 5031NV & NVG589 modems) is a different animal. The modem sync rate and your "internet speed" are not directly related. On VDSL your internet speed is as follows: 3Mbps = 3000Kbps, 6mbps = 6000Kbps and so on. Your modem sync rate will either be 13.5mbps/1.5mbps, 19mbps/2mbps, 25mbps/2mbps, 32mbps/5mbps or 55mbps/6mbps.

    If you are running a speed test and getting 700KB/sec there is nothing wrong with your service.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2013
  23. Mister Natural

    Mister Natural 2[H]4U

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  24. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    Redacted
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013
  25. Liger88

    Liger88 2[H]4U

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    lol I think you had it right the first time, just took it too far by dividing by 1024 then by 1024 again.

    i.e. 5,600,000 million bytes will ALWAYS be 700,000 thousand bytes (as 8 bits equal 1 byte). If you convert that to KiloBytes proper in binary terms you'd divide that by 1024 and get 683KBps from original rate of bytes to kilobytes as we call them by 1024 instead of 1,000.


    In the end this is why we just say divide by 8 lol. It's close enough that it avoids all this confusion.
     
  26. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    Redacted
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013
  27. Liger88

    Liger88 2[H]4U

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    lol yup and I agree. Shit gets more confusing than it needs to be.


    Thanks a lot binary. :p
     
  28. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    So it's normal I should of asked before he left but he was setting up my parents laptops while I was messing around with steam's download rate.
     
  29. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    Windows Speed: (Base 2)

    5.6 / 8 * 1024 = 716.8 KB/s

    Max theoretical: 6 / 8 * 1024 = 768 KB/s. Give or take 10% for overhead and you have roughly 700 KB/s.

    In other words, you are seeing your correct speeds.

    Network Speed: (Base 10)

    5600000 / 8 / 1024 = 683.6 KB/s.

    Clear as mud? :p
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013
  30. TCM2

    TCM2 Gawd

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    The last one is correct, the first two aren't.

    6 Mbps = 6000000 / 8 / 1024 = 732.42 KB/s.
    5.6 Mbps = 5600000 / 8 / 1024 = 683.59 KB/s.

    How are you getting two different results for 5.6 Mbps?

    Edit: I'm not addressing anyone directly, but it's quite shocking how many people are handling professional equipment and what not and don't even grasp the basics in networking.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013
  31. Mister Natural

    Mister Natural 2[H]4U

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  32. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    Technically it'd be 700 KB/s and 683.6 KiB/s.

    If I understand this correctly.

    There's a reason people don't understand this; they aren't using the correct units. No one ever taught me the actual difference between Mebi and Mega before.

    It'd be nice if everyone used the appropriate standards.
     
  33. TCM2

    TCM2 Gawd

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    Everyone using computers for more than 10 years will acknowledge that 1 KB/s is 1024 bytes per second. KiB is bullshit if you ask me. When I write KB, MB and GB, it's 1024, 1048576 and 1073741824 bytes. Nothing else makes sense with computers. It's sad the HDD makers got through with their fraud.

    Still doesn't change the fact that signal transmission is frequency-based and those have always been base-10, before any HDD bullshit and when everyone knew computers operated in base-2.
     
  34. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    True.

    So simply dividing 5.6 Mbps by 8 to get 0.7 MB/s *IS* technically correct, most people would see 0.67 MB/s (Actually MiB/s) as being correct.

    In other words, OP is getting his full speed :p haha.
     
  35. TCM2

    TCM2 Gawd

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    If you make the distinction between MB/s and MiB/s, then yes, it would be correct. It's just that noone ever anywhere uses this definition of MB/s.
     
  36. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    So would the download rate in Windows vs OSX (since they use different bases to show storage) vary? In this case the same 5.6 Mb/s would show as 0.7 MB/s in OSX and 0.67 MB/s in Windows or do they both use base 10 when showing network speeds?
     
  37. TCM2

    TCM2 Gawd

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    Windows shows KB, MB, GB but means KiB, MiB, GiB. They just haven't transitioned yet. Just look at the properties of a drive in Windows: 736,910,958,592 bytes in use = 686 GB. That's what's literally on my screen right now.

    I have never ever seen a program show MB/s to mean 1000000 bytes/s.

    Edit: This thread is proof to me that SI units caused more confusion than they ever solved. Simply redefining MB to no longer mean base-2 but base-10 instead was the greatest fuckup anyone could do.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013
  38. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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