ASUS PRIME Z590-P/I5-10600k

man00

Limp Gawd
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Jan 26, 2009
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154
Thinking of upgrading to the above, right now using a Asus Z97-AR/ I5-4670k. Motherboard getting old still works fine.
Haven't read up much on the Z590 are there many issues with this board?
How much of bang if any should I expect if I go this route?
thanks
 

E4g1e

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There are better budget choices from MSI and Gigabyte than that Asus PRIME Z590-P, even for an i5-10600K. The VRMs on the Z590-P are rather poor in quality. The Z590-P runs significantly hotter than the MSI Z590-A Pro and the Gigabyte Z590-UD.

If you do go Asus, you will have to spend more money for a motherboard if you want to even play around a little bit with your planned i5-10600K.

And as I stated earlier, Asus' budget motherboards have been very hit-and-miss -- more miss than hit, IMHO. In the case of that Z590-P, its quality is more like the average B560 motherboard than a decent Z590 motherboard.
 
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Nasgul

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Jun 11, 2005
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142
10600K? Go for the 8/16 CPU. It'll last you longer, 'cause when I see you're coming from a 2005 CPU, is best to just go for the next tier and likely will last a little longer. $200 now than $900 for an extended year?
>
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E168131...oards - intel-_-asus-_-13119372&source=region
>
The ASUS looks like a great board (and check out the reviews, looks like in the OPINION of others it's been a great "hit"), personally, I only use ASUS now, tried the other brands and they're "meh", except the worst brand for MoBo's has to be gigabyte, had one ditched it 4 days later never again to buy from that brand.
 

E4g1e

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The lousy test results of that Z590-P came from Hardware Unboxed. They actually tested its VRM performance against those of other budget Z590 motherboards. It is the second-worst performer (VRM-wise) overall; the only budget Z590 motherboard that was worse came from ASRock (which actually throttled back the CPU’s clock speed during testing).

That’s very disappointing, given the relatively good performance of its Z490 predecessor (the PRIME Z490-P).
 

chameleoneel

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Thinking of upgrading to the above, right now using a Asus Z97-AR/ I5-4670k. Motherboard getting old still works fine.
Haven't read up much on the Z590 are there many issues with this board?
How much of bang if any should I expect if I go this route?
thanks
FYI: With most 500 series motherboards, the 1st NVME SSD drive slot does not work with 10 series CPUs. If you want to use all 3 SSD slots on this motherboard or most 500 series boards, you need to buy an 11 series CPU.

*MSI is the only brand which offered 1st slot functionality for 10 series CPUs. But that is on their newer 2 slot boards. I haven't looked at their motherboards with 3 slots.
 

E4g1e

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FYI: With most 500 series motherboards, the 1st NVME SSD drive slot does not work with 10 series CPUs. If you want to use all 3 SSD slots on this motherboard or most 500 series boards, you need to buy an 11 series CPU.

*MSI is the only brand which offered 1st slot functionality for 10 series CPUs. But that is on their newer 2 slot boards. I haven't looked at their motherboards with 3 slots.
It is true with MSI as well. Every single ATX motherboard from MSI has three or more m.2 slots, of which one of them cannot be used at all with a 10th-Gen Intel CPU. One will have to choose a microATX or a mini-ITX board just to have only two m.2 slots.
 

Dan_D

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FYI: With most 500 series motherboards, the 1st NVME SSD drive slot does not work with 10 series CPUs. If you want to use all 3 SSD slots on this motherboard or most 500 series boards, you need to buy an 11 series CPU.

*MSI is the only brand which offered 1st slot functionality for 10 series CPUs. But that is on their newer 2 slot boards. I haven't looked at their motherboards with 3 slots.
This is because the 10th generation and earlier CPU's do not have dedicated PCIe lanes for NVMe storage. They have 16 lanes which can generally only be split into an x8/x8 configuration and that's it. The 11th generation has 20 lanes which are in a x16/x4 configuration. The x16 lanes can be divided the same way as previous generations, but the x4 lanes are just like AMD's implementation and are specifically used for storage. Even if you can divide up the lanes more, the primary M.2 slot is hard wired to use to the x4 lanes of the 11th generation CPU's dedicated to M.2 / NVMe drives.
 

chameleoneel

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This is because the 10th generation and earlier CPU's do not have dedicated PCIe lanes for NVMe storage. They have 16 lanes which can generally only be split into an x8/x8 configuration and that's it. The 11th generation has 20 lanes which are in a x16/x4 configuration. The x16 lanes can be divided the same way as previous generations, but the x4 lanes are just like AMD's implementation and are specifically used for storage. Even if you can divide up the lanes more, the primary M.2 slot is hard wired to use to the x4 lanes of the 11th generation CPU's dedicated to M.2 / NVMe drives.
Right. But on MSI's newer two slot boards, they also wired one of the chipset PCI-E 3.0 storage lanes, to slot 1. So you can use both slots with a 10 series CPU.
 

LouPoir

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I've been very pleased with Gigabyte M/B. I currently use the Z590 Elite AX. Has all the features one would need.
 

E4g1e

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I've been very pleased with Gigabyte M/B. I currently use the Z590 Elite AX. Has all the features one would need.
This, like all other Z590 motherboards with three or more m.2 sockets, will not function to its full potential with any 10th-Gen CPU. One or more of its m.2 sockets will not function at all with a 10th-Gen CPU. The primary m.2 socket is permanently "hard-wired" (actually, hard-routed) to the direct PCI-e controller in the 11th-Gen CPUs. The 10th-Gen CPUs have no such controller at all.

As such, all of the 500-chipset motherboards, particularly those with three or more m.2 sockets, are a waste of money if one is going to stick with a 10th-Gen CPU and never upgrade to an 11th-Gen CPU during the support lifetime of the LGA 1200 platform. The OP should stick with a 400-series chipset if he is going to "permanently" remain with a 10th-Gen CPU in that system.
 

xDiVolatilX

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11th gen still only has 20 pcie lanes? Wow. My 6900k has 40. When are they gonna make 11th gen with more lanes? I want to run a sound card also along with the big graphics card & m.2 of course.
 

E4g1e

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11th gen still only has 20 pcie lanes? Wow. My 6900k has 40. When are they gonna make 11th gen with more lanes? I want to run a sound card also along with the big graphics card & m.2 of course.
Here's the actual breakdown:

The mainstream-socket CPUs have more limited numbers of PCIe lanes to begin with. In the case of the 11th-Gen CPUs, there are actually 28 total PCIe lanes - eight of which are used to connect to a 500-series chipset on the motherboard (however, when an 11th-Gen CPU is used with a 400-series chipset, only four of those eight lanes are used), plus four more routing directly to an m.2 storage slot (in addition to the 16 configurable lanes to GPU slots). 10th-Gen CPUs still have only 20 total PCIe lanes - four to a motherboard chipset, 16 configurable to GPU expansion slots.

The HEDT CPUs have more PCIe lanes, but Intel's version of the HEDT platform has not been updated in the past several years. In addition, the 6000-series Broadwell-E platform is now a legacy product. There are absolutely no 11th-Gen HEDT CPUs at all. The most recent Intel HEDT platform is the "10th-Gen" Cascade Lake-X architecture, which is practically nothing more than a tweaked version of the 7th-Gen (Skylake-X) architecture - nothing in the way of new features while the clock speeds were boosted over and over again.

In other words, Intel does not currently care about the HEDT segment of the market. And even the 11th-Gen mainstream desktop line is more of an afterthought. Intel is concentrating most of its new CPU priorities on the server and the mobile markets. As a result of that, there are highly-multicore (and very expensive) server CPUs based on the 10th-Gen Ice Lake architecture (and yes, this is a true 10th-Gen CPU, unlike the faux-10th-Gen HEDT CPUs) while the HEDT fans are left holding the bag.
 

kirbyrj

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Here's the actual breakdown:

The mainstream-socket CPUs have more limited numbers of PCIe lanes to begin with. In the case of the 11th-Gen CPUs, there are actually 28 total PCIe lanes - eight of which are used to connect to a 500-series chipset on the motherboard (however, when an 11th-Gen CPU is used with a 400-series chipset, only four of those eight lanes are used), plus four more routing directly to an m.2 storage slot (in addition to the 16 configurable lanes to GPU slots). 10th-Gen CPUs still have only 20 total PCIe lanes - four to a motherboard chipset, 16 configurable to GPU expansion slots.

The HEDT CPUs have more PCIe lanes, but Intel's version of the HEDT platform has not been updated in the past several years. In addition, the 6000-series Broadwell-E platform is now a legacy product. There are absolutely no 11th-Gen HEDT CPUs at all. The most recent Intel HEDT platform is the "10th-Gen" Cascade Lake-X architecture, which is practically nothing more than a tweaked version of the 7th-Gen (Skylake-X) architecture - nothing in the way of new features while the clock speeds were boosted over and over again.

In other words, Intel does not currently care about the HEDT segment of the market. And even the 11th-Gen mainstream desktop line is more of an afterthought. Intel is concentrating most of its new CPU priorities on the server and the mobile markets. As a result of that, there are highly-multicore (and very expensive) server CPUs based on the 10th-Gen Ice Lake architecture (and yes, this is a true 10th-Gen CPU, unlike the faux-10th-Gen HEDT CPUs) while the HEDT fans are left holding the bag.

I mean 7th through 10th generation are all iterations of Skylake anyway. Rocket lake is the closest to a next generation part but it is hampered by the process size. I don't think you are missing much on Intel HEDT right now.
 
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