Assigned IP address issues in my network

saedrin

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Messages
2,011
Hi everyone, I'm having a bit of an issue on my network ATM. I want to setup my network so that all of the servers are under their own subset (ie. 192.168.2.XXX), all of the DHCP PC's that connect are under the standard (192.168.1.100+) as assigned by the router, and all of my personal machines are under their own subset as well (192.168.3.XXX).

Router is standard 192.168.1.1

I've tried fiddling with the subnet mask (from 255.255.255.0 to 255.255.0.0) on both the router and the servers and I can't keep them connected to the router when I set the servers to their static (192.168.2.XXX) IP's.

Am I missing something really obvious?

Also, should I set the DNS to the router IP when assigning the IP settings in windows? (you can tell I'm not too familiar with intermediate networking now :eek:)
 

StarTrek4U

Gawd
Joined
Jan 8, 2003
Messages
1,011
First off, we'll need what type of router you're working with. I'm also not clear on the three subnets you're talking about- you have one for servers, one for your personal machines, and then a 3rd one... what's that one for? I'm guessing this is for your home, and if that's the case I'm assuming you know that most home routers will only give out DHCP for one subnet.

Breaking up subnets like you want to does not require you to change the subnet mask, so you can leave it at 255.255.255.0.

Unless you have a specific internal DNS server you can point your DNS at your router.

Why do you want to do this? Separate networks for simple home networks really aren't needed.




 

ghost6303

2[H]4U
Joined
Jul 24, 2004
Messages
2,291
you need to make sure all the computers on the network are using subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 in order for what you describe to work, not just the router and servers.

a computer with IP 192.168.1.xxx and subnet of 255.255.255.0 will only be able to talk to IPs in the range of 192.168.1.1-254
 

ShadowStriker

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 8, 2009
Messages
1,669
Like StarTrek4U said, we'll need to know the type of router, if you're using a Cisco, its pretty easy as long as you have a router and switch(es) that supports VLANing.
 

saedrin

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Messages
2,011
First off, we'll need what type of router you're working with. I'm also not clear on the three subnets you're talking about- you have one for servers, one for your personal machines, and then a 3rd one... what's that one for? I'm guessing this is for your home, and if that's the case I'm assuming you know that most home routers will only give out DHCP for one subnet.

Breaking up subnets like you want to does not require you to change the subnet mask, so you can leave it at 255.255.255.0.

Unless you have a specific internal DNS server you can point your DNS at your router.

Why do you want to do this? Separate networks for simple home networks really aren't needed.

192.168.1.XXX is for DHCP from the router, IE any machines that connect wirelessly or machines that connect physically that are not set to have a specific IP.

192.168.2.XXX is for my media servers on the network.

192.168.3.XXX is for my personal workstation, laptops, etc

I want all three groups to be able to talk to each other and connect to the router (192.168.1.1). My reasoning is because I want to see if I can, curiosity has gotten the best of me.

you need to make sure all the computers on the network are using subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 in order for what you describe to work, not just the router and servers.

a computer with IP 192.168.1.xxx and subnet of 255.255.255.0 will only be able to talk to IPs in the range of 192.168.1.1-254

This is what I was reading. You both seem to have opposite view points on whether I need to change the subnet. Will I have to set the subnets on the DHCP machines to 255.255.0.0 as well? I wasn't aware you could do this with a non-static IP on a network, or at least the boxes are grayed out (in windows) when the local IP is set to be assigned by the router.

Like StarTrek4U said, we'll need to know the type of router, if you're using a Cisco, its pretty easy as long as you have a router and switch(es) that supports VLANing.

WRT54G with DD-WRT set to run DHCP from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150.
 

StarTrek4U

Gawd
Joined
Jan 8, 2003
Messages
1,011
A quick google search seems to indicate that it's possible although again for home use unnecessary.

But since you want to try it you should first understand how VLANs work since it appears that you don't. At it's most basic:

You're creating 3 separate networks (aka broadcast domains) that you want to have talk to each other. The 192.168.x.x is your network, and the 255.255.x.x is your subnet mask. In the simplest terms the subnet mask allows you to separate a single 192.168.x.x network into multiple networks (hence sub-networks). Without getting too deep in to how subnetting works for what you're trying to do you don't need to change the subnet mask. You are creating 3 class C networks and not breaking them up any more. You would need to change your subnet if you wanted to break the 192.168.1.x network in to smaller pieces, but since you're not- you don't. Your subnets are breaking up the 192.168.0.0 network into 192.168.1.x, 192.168.2.x, and 192.168.3.x.

I would recommend you take some time to read about subnets, vlans, and how subnetting actually works since what you're trying to do relies on understanding these fundamentals of networking.

I can't help you with the specific setting on DD-WRT since I work on more enterprise level stuff. However, at a high level you want to add the port(s) on your router to the right network it's attached to, and setup your router to send traffic between them. You also want to ensure all are allowed out to the internet (unless you don't want them to get out for some reason). Again, since you don't have dedicated DNS you're going to have to do everything by IP.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Messages
540
You just need to have the subnet on everything(router,servers,etc) to 255.255.0.0. That will mean everything in the range of 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255 can talk to each other without needing to get into static routes and gateways etc.
 

StarTrek4U

Gawd
Joined
Jan 8, 2003
Messages
1,011
You just need to have the subnet on everything(router,servers,etc) to 255.255.0.0. That will mean everything in the range of 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255 can talk to each other without needing to get into static routes and gateways etc.

This is also true provided your router knows the network that is attached to it. But this also then is not creating separate networks- it's just one large network.
 

dle1232003

n00b
Joined
Aug 20, 2010
Messages
38
one question....why? Seems stupid.

its not, its to create logically seperate networks, where you can control what talks to what, via the use of access control lists, however if you have your DNS in a different place, then your pc needs to know where to look for it, I.E the router, and then the router would route the packet to the intended hop.

you should maybe try reading up on IP routing

I think this might be a good read

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...iKsmoq71nWmOFwUIw&sig2=KsNbBq_qFFKWn9WKEgUjNw
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Messages
540
This is also true provided your router knows the network that is attached to it. But this also then is not creating separate networks- it's just one large network.

He never said he wanted separate subnets. He said subsets which I assume he just wants it for an organizational standpoint, so in this case one large network is what he wants. He wants everything to communicate with everything so I doubt he wants subnets. So all he needs is all his gear in 192.168.x.x with a 255.255.0.0 subnet.
 

marley1

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jul 18, 2000
Messages
5,447
Lol at guy above I know why just silly in a house, I do same thing on our business network just no point in your house
 

saedrin

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Messages
2,011
He never said he wanted separate subnets. He said subsets which I assume he just wants it for an organizational standpoint, so in this case one large network is what he wants. He wants everything to communicate with everything so I doubt he wants subnets. So all he needs is all his gear in 192.168.x.x with a 255.255.0.0 subnet.

Exactly. Thanks for the info everyone. I'm going to give it a try and see what I can make happen. :)
 
Top