Are we in the PC Gaming Dark Age?

Have we entered the dark age of PC gaming?

  • Yes

    Votes: 26 31.0%
  • No

    Votes: 51 60.7%
  • I do not know, not sure

    Votes: 7 8.3%

  • Total voters
    84

biggles

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With cryptocurrency massively driving up GPU prices, have we entered the dark age for PC gaming?

Not saying it is the death of PC gaming. I have heard that predicted many times before and that has not happened, it won't happen IMO.

But for people on a budget, upgrading the GPU is pretty hard to do right now. And there is no end in sight to the skyrocketing prices for graphics cards. It was not too long ago that graphics cards just kept getting better and better while getting cheaper and cheaper. Ah, the good old days...

Not that this is the end of the world. We still have console games, smartphone games, and fun outdoor activities are still allowed!

But it looks grim for PC gaming due to cryptocurrency. And there does not appear to be a reliable forecast as to when GPU prices will return to their historical pricing patterns.
 

Comixbooks

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I seen some idiot crypto kid on Now in Stock saying gamers should buy 1060 cards and leave the 1080ti cards for the miners.

To think they are above the entire gaming industry is crazy Nvidia and AMD need to step in and link the Cards to Steam accounts in order for them to work.
 
D

Deleted member 88301

Guest
I don't know. But sky-high GPU costs are a real serious issue. When you have enthusiasts buying full-blown rigs, and then selling off the included GPU, well, something isn't right.

I don't hate the miners, but I certainly hate the situation that mining has put gamers in.
 

KazeoHin

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So, it's not a dark age, more like a crusade. The actual PC gaming dark age was the time after the release of Deus Ex Invisible War and before the release of The Elder Scrolls V Skyrim. We are in the tail end of the PC gaming renaissance age now, going into the PC gaming industrial age.
 

Flogger23m

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The actual PC gaming dark age was the time after the release of Deus Ex Invisible War and before the release of The Elder Scrolls V Skyrim. We are in the tail end of the PC gaming renaissance age now, going into the PC gaming industrial age.

I don't see how that was a low point for PC gaming. Honestly it was better back then than it was now. What we lost:

- Modding. ArmA 3 and Fallout 4 are the only recent games that allow some small mods but both are limited by their engines. We haven't seen any great total conversions like Counter Strike, Red Orchestra, Insurgency, or anything for years. Those died around 2007-2008 and haven't been seen since.

- We lost AAA games designed around PCs. Now almost every game is design around consoles or multiplatform. Remember GRAW? PC gamers got a more realistic semi tactical 1st person shooter which caters more to the hardcore gamer which is found on PC. Console gamers got a 3rd person action cover shooter. What did we get last year? Wildlands, a 3rd person action shooter designed around consoles and gamer-bros. Much win, so wow. Also, what happened to RTS games? Flight sims are as niche as ever. Racing sims seem to be doing okay. PC centric games have more or less stayed the game or in some cases genres have more or less died.

- Match making, floaty console shooters have taken the PC industry by storm. Overwatch, ect. I think Battlefield is the last big AAA multi player games to have a server browser left. Even BF1 is eroding at that.

- Free to play MMOs. I know these exist on consoles, but these originated on the PC. Every other MP game is some crappy free to play MMO.

- Not directly related, but slightly. Twitch. Enough said.

The only thing that we have gained:

- Good controller support, which was needed for fighting style games, arcadey vehicle games and similar.


Seems like we lost a lot more than we gained.
 

spaceman

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When we feel the way we do about old school kingdom come.....yeah. The days before consoles, mega corp gaming assholes and mining were better. Bf1942 mods like dc and Poe. Twl and Cal ladders. Teams talking shit to each other. Scrims every night. Yeah.
 
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Multiplatform was bound to happen due to skyrocketing development costs for AAA titles. Because of the fancy graphics and physics that gamers demanded the cost to make an AAA game is astronomical now, yet that game still only retails for $60, same it always did. This is cold hard economics. So we are stuck with DLC and multiplatform unless people are willing to shell out 200 for a game, they aren't.

Multiplatform and DLC have saved PC gaming more than they have harmed it. That may not be something people like, but it's the reality of the situation. They also aren't "consolized" most of that bullshit started on the PC and infected consoles, and a lot of console gernes lost their depth and beauty as well. The truth is that games have to be designed for the average idiot, not the dedicated gamer. This is also due to the cost of making games.

If anything is hurting gaming it's fancy graphics, blame NVidia, amd, and people that like spiffy visuals.

As for crypto mining... this is a tulip bulb bubble combined with libertarian nonsense. It will eventually implode and go away. It's also not the first time we've seen electronics plus bubbles, DRAM price rigging, intel price gouging, shit going into bubbles and costing way more than it actually should is a time honored tradition in consumer electronics. it always sucks, and then it always pops and fixes itself.

Everything is fine and there is no real need to chicken little about it. Buy indie games if you want a deep game that doesn't cater to the lowest common demoninator, stay away from fancy AAA graphics if you want a quality game. Wait out the current GPU bubble and laugh when all these idiots lose their shirts.
 

Domingo

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IMO PC gaming is in the best shape it has been in for years. 95% of the games that are coming out on consoles are also coming out on the PC. The only ones we're missing out on are the Sony exclusives. We're also getting the unmistakable best versions of everything and typically for $5-10 less than the console versions, too. Even when games are a "shitty port" they're still better than the console versions thanks to higher resolutions and framerates.

Literally the only thing hampering PC gaming at the moment = high GPU prices. The argument can be made that gaming itself is at a crossroads (microtransactions vs. $60 and done), but that's certainly not exclusive to the PC.
 

heatlesssun

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We're in a rough spot for the DIY PC gaming market but that's just a fraction of the overall PC gaming market. There's more game content on the PC than ever across a wide spectrum of types so I think in terms of games the PC is a good spot today.
 

THUMPer

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Not just crypto, but the quality of games is shit. BF1 is totally FUCKED now. I used to play that every day. I actually uninstalled it.
 

Nimisys

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I think there is somesome that can come out of this mining bullshit. Developers can no longer expect people to be on a yearly or even every other year GPU cycle, so visuals will have to become better optimized and don't get to carry your game. Hopefully that means better content and mechanics will be needed to for sales. I miss the old days where you can expect 75-100hr of real content in BioWare games. If we are going to be stuck graphically for a while, might as well return the focus to story.
 

Brian_B

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I thought the PS3/X360 console era was the Dark Age for PC Gaming - we were stuck with DX9 for a really really long time, and are just now starting to turn the corner away from that. On top of that what the PC did get was a lot of crappy console ports.
 

Mega6

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-Death of SLI
-Crippling demand from Miners depleting GPU supply
-Console ports

Yeah, it's probably the end of the world as we know it.
 

odditory

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The drama queening on this is a little much. PC gaming isn't suddenly dying just because the most expensive, luxury GPU tier has been more expensive and hard to get for a few weeks. The many millions of GPUs purchased by gamers before January 2018 didn't just cease to exist.

If you bother to look at Steam stats and see the median GPU config, you'd realize it's nowhere near high end Pascal's anyway. Videogame developers do not target the extreme high end of GPUs, they target the median. Game developers are actually far more interested in getting their titles playable on intel IGP's, believe it or not, because that's where the massive install base is. How games perform on average GPUs is most important to them; the fringe high end is after thought.
 
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James21

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Messages
148
I think actually the outlook for PC gaming hardware is pretty bright.

CPUs, SSDs & memory while a bit expensive are faster than ever before
Monitor choices are excellent currently

Video cards are better than ever & while they are a bit more expensive than many would like, the fact that they are in high demand and selling well gives both AMD and Nvidia money / motivation to invest in R&D / Production of even better cards that work faster & the fact that Mining is saving AMD's rear end on their video card side is going to let them keep up the pressure on Nvidia to come out with newer / better / faster stuff to stay competitive.

So while the prices for the high end top of the line rigs are a lot higher, the performance is better than ever.
In addition, over the average lifespan of your gaming rig such as 1 to 2 years before you upgrade, you can run some crypto mining in the background that will more than make up for the higher prices in the end.
Essentially, if you were one to upgrade your video card every 2 years, you can essentially game with it & let it mine to pay for the next one in 2 years if you wish.
Or if you upgrade every year, there is a strong market for used higher end cards at better prices than ever.
 
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video card prices were also going to go up without crypto mining. There is a reason NVidia is selling 1500+ Titans and made the old 256bit card the midrange card and now charges extra for the 384bit card. Crypto mining isn't it, they know their market and half of it is bragging about what you have.
 

zamardii12

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I don't see how that was a low point for PC gaming. Honestly it was better back then than it was now. What we lost:

- Modding. ArmA 3 and Fallout 4 are the only recent games that allow some small mods but both are limited by their engines. We haven't seen any great total conversions like Counter Strike, Red Orchestra, Insurgency, or anything for years. Those died around 2007-2008 and haven't been seen since.

- We lost AAA games designed around PCs. Now almost every game is design around consoles or multiplatform. Remember GRAW? PC gamers got a more realistic semi tactical 1st person shooter which caters more to the hardcore gamer which is found on PC. Console gamers got a 3rd person action cover shooter. What did we get last year? Wildlands, a 3rd person action shooter designed around consoles and gamer-bros. Much win, so wow. Also, what happened to RTS games? Flight sims are as niche as ever. Racing sims seem to be doing okay. PC centric games have more or less stayed the game or in some cases genres have more or less died.

- Match making, floaty console shooters have taken the PC industry by storm. Overwatch, ect. I think Battlefield is the last big AAA multi player games to have a server browser left. Even BF1 is eroding at that.

- Free to play MMOs. I know these exist on consoles, but these originated on the PC. Every other MP game is some crappy free to play MMO.

- Not directly related, but slightly. Twitch. Enough said.

The only thing that we have gained:

- Good controller support, which was needed for fighting style games, arcadey vehicle games and similar.


Seems like we lost a lot more than we gained.

What I would add in terms of Mods is that you have to look at the economy of it. We may have lost more-or-less modding in the way that we have become used to it in the past, but new things have arisen since then mainly being Steam Green Light, Early Access, Indie games, and crowd funding.

People love their free mods and so do I. I love that there is a PC modding community out there still, but now at least if someone wants to make a great mod or rather instead of making a mod, making a expansion and/or new game entirely then they could potentially be compensated for their hard work. Bethesda tried to incorporate this into Fallout 4 I think, which essentially was a "paid mods" thing and the entire community shit on that idea. I seemed to be the only person who wouldn't have minded it because they weren't taking free mods away; they were simply opening an avenue for people who spend hours upon hours of time making mods to get compensated for their work and time. I wonder what sort of content we could have seen had the community not blown up over that idea.

So in a sense we lost modding to an extent, but we also gained a lot of options in the terms of choosing mods and projects that we want to support financially. A perfect example is Kingdom Come: Deliverance. That was crowd-funded and 10-15 years ago would have never seen the light of day if not for this new platform. PUBG was also a Early Access title. Relatively simple idea that has taken the gaming world by storm now.

So, in a way you are right about losing modding but you are wrong in saying we lost more than we gained b/c there are infinitely more options now. There are so many game studios out there making games (Indie and AAA) that it becomes overwhelming at times, and it is really hard for me now in my 30s to even finish a game b/c there is always something new and exciting coming down the pipe.
 

Spaceninja

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There are lots of original and different indie games, sometimes finding a diamond in all the turds is difficult. I use to play a lot of MMO's, now they are mostly F2P/P2W. Most of the AAA titles are FPS's and I have been bored with those since DOOM 3. Cities Skylines held my attention for a while, but even it got to a point where I was bored with it. It seems there use to be a more diverse ecosystem of games, now it is down to just a few genres and that's it. You either collect rat pelts for some contact or shoot Nazi's, Commies, Zombies, Nazi Zombies and so forth. Stories have been reduced to a few hours of gameplay and seemly an afterthought to multiplayer that is buggy and unbalanced. Add in the various editions of games you can buy. Basic, What should be offered, and Ultimate special edition.

Long story short, gaming overall is a mess.
 

Cranky1970

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The drama queening on this is a little much. PC gaming isn't suddenly dying just because the most expensive, luxury GPU tier has been more expensive and hard to get for a few weeks. The many millions of GPUs purchased by gamers before January 2018 didn't just cease to exist.

If you bother to look at Steam stats and see the median GPU config, you'd realize it's nowhere near high end Pascal's anyway. Videogame developers do not target the extreme high end of GPUs, they target the median. Game developers are actually far more interested in getting their titles playable on intel IGP's, believe it or not, because that's where the massive install base is. How games perform on average GPUs is most important to them; the fringe high end is after thought.


This is pretty much spot on IMO....
 

Mr. Baz

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Many of you make very good and very valid points. Being of the older gaming generation, I remember the classic games that focussed on gameplay. Those might not have had the best graphics, but man were they so fun to play.

Now, everyone seems to focus on blingy graphics and the SAME OLD GAMEPLAY instead of coming up with something new.

That being said, we now have FANTASTIC game engines that can crank out some awesome stuff. Like many other people mentioned, the problem is ROI. Developers have to pay their employees. They need to crank out a game fast enough to make a profit.

The UNREAL 4 game engine is now completely open to the public with OODLES of tutorials. After some dedicated learning/training, even a novice can crank out a game that looks really good visually. That means you can spend your time with story/plot development and unique angles of game story. Seriously, go check out all of the games that have been independently developed using the UNREAL 4 engine. That should give you enough titles to last you a couple of months. Oh, and most of them are pretty cheap compared to your typical mainstream PC game.
 

Flogger23m

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What I would add in terms of Mods is that you have to look at the economy of it. We may have lost more-or-less modding in the way that we have become used to it in the past, but new things have arisen since then mainly being Steam Green Light, Early Access, Indie games, and crowd funding.

People love their free mods and so do I. I love that there is a PC modding community out there still, but now at least if someone wants to make a great mod or rather instead of making a mod, making a expansion and/or new game entirely then they could potentially be compensated for their hard work. Bethesda tried to incorporate this into Fallout 4 I think, which essentially was a "paid mods" thing and the entire community shit on that idea. I seemed to be the only person who wouldn't have minded it because they weren't taking free mods away; they were simply opening an avenue for people who spend hours upon hours of time making mods to get compensated for their work and time. I wonder what sort of content we could have seen had the community not blown up over that idea.

So in a sense we lost modding to an extent, but we also gained a lot of options in the terms of choosing mods and projects that we want to support financially. A perfect example is Kingdom Come: Deliverance. That was crowd-funded and 10-15 years ago would have never seen the light of day if not for this new platform. PUBG was also a Early Access title. Relatively simple idea that has taken the gaming world by storm now.

So, in a way you are right about losing modding but you are wrong in saying we lost more than we gained b/c there are infinitely more options now. There are so many game studios out there making games (Indie and AAA) that it becomes overwhelming at times, and it is really hard for me now in my 30s to even finish a game b/c there is always something new and exciting coming down the pipe.

The Bethesda idea of paid mods was an entire mess and would have killed modding. A lot of the great mods are made by various contributions and building off of others work. A great mod may turn out simple and it may borrow a 3D model, some scripts here and there, some sounds and whatnot from other mods. Eventually if it gets popular enough and attracts enough developers this content may be replaced with unique in house content. Just look at any decently large mod for ArmA 3. It takes content from various sources. Now imagine all of that content was paid. Good luck getting a decently sized mod off the ground if you have to pay and license content from other modders... and charge your customers for said licensed content. You'll end up charging customers up front for something not worth the money. Good mods took months or years to develop and had modest beginnings. You'll end up with mods designed to be monetized; just like AAA studio, why would you make something risky when you can potentially make more money by doing more of the same? And you'll see a further break down of large scale mods and more skins, models, and small paid mods similar to AAA game DLC.

We do have early access, but the majority of those games are not good and end up never being worth their price tag. We don't have anymore options than we did 10 years ago. The single platform game design had died back in the N64/PS era. The only notable change is a few more Japanese games are being ported to PC. Even then, about half if not more of the AAA games are owned by Sony or Nintendo and will never see a PC release for obvious reasons. Even years ago we were seeing numerous Japanese games on PC, Resident Evil, Metal Gear you name it.
 
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The Bethesda idea of paid mods was an entire mess and would have killed modding. A lot of the great mods are made by various contributions and building off of others work. A great mod may turn out simple and it may borrow a 3D model, some scripts here and there, some sounds and whatnot from other mods. Eventually if it gets popular enough and attracts enough developers this content may be replaced with unique in house content. Just look at any decently large mod for ArmA 3. It takes content from various sources. Now imagine all of that content was paid. Good luck getting a decently sized mod off the ground if you have to pay and license content from other modders... and charge your customers for said licensed content. You'll end up charging customers up front for something not worth the money. Good mods took months or years to develop and had modest beginnings. You'll end up with mods designed to be monetized; just like AAA studio, why would you make something risky when you can potentially make more money by doing more of the same? And you'll see a further break down of large scale mods and more skins, models, and small paid mods similar to AAA game DLC.

We do have early access, but the majority of those games are not good and end up never being worth their price tag. We don't have anymore options than we did 10 years ago. The single platform game design had died back in the N64/PS era. The only notable change is a few more Japanese games are being ported to PC. Even then, about half if not more of the AAA games are owned by Sony or Nintendo and will never see a PC release for obvious reasons. Even years ago we were seeing numerous Japanese games on PC, Resident Evil, Metal Gear you name it.

Part of the issue with Japanese games is that the Japanese for the most part do not game on the PC. There are rape simulators, dating simulators, and hentai games but outside of that the PC is considered a joke there.

Handheld systems do better in Japan, so that is the focus of those developers. And a lot of console games there are "made to be played the way the creator intended", so you will get stuff like hard locked frame rates, hard locked aspect ratios and other stuff. They like it that way, and they are not about to let someone else trample on the artistic vision of the game.

Even for stuff that does exist on the PC for multiplatform like say Street Fighter, they won't play it on the PC, they will play the console version.

This isn't going to change. It's just a very different country where mobile gaming makes sense due to long work hours and long commutes, an active arcade video game café scene, and home gaming being something of a single player only type affair of stuff like Dragon Quest.

For Japanese centric games, the PC might as well not exist. Though all the perverted games are starting to come to the US.
 

XvMMvX

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Gaming on PC has nothing to do with graphics or new games.

Retroarch and the fact that my games "don't go away" after a system is obsolete are why PC gaming is great.

That and as others have said it seems that games are DLC grind fest. The model is now how can I get gamers to play ONLY my game and nothing else. For example, I am guilty because I only play BF4 for a long time, as I was unlocking/progressing etc.
 

M76

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I don't think a few months of gpu shortages will do in gaming. I assume most gamers already have GPUs, and unless they're fools who sell their cards to miners for a quick buck, they can keep gaming with those gpus for at least a few years.

And I'm still hopeful that this will blow over by the time a gpu upgrade can no longer be put off for most. If it doesn't blow over on it's own governments will surely step in to regulate crypto trading, they will probably step in for the wrong reasons, but I won't look a gift horse in the mouth as long as it does away with the mining craze.
 

lilbabycat

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AAA gaming on PC is shit, but it also gets 90% of what consoles get, so whats that tell you about consoles?

Multiplayer gaming on PC is in a dark age, I'll give you that. PC gaming communities are either incredibly tiny and niche (but good); or they're straight shit. There is no moderate or large multiplayer gaming community that isn't fundamentally fucked up. If it involves other players, it involves the worst kind of players in almost every match. Much of this is the lack of private servers and/or modding on the "good titles". Any recent battlefield game with proper private servers and any semblance of modding would allow for extremely good communities to form. (But that would hurt sales of the yearly-rehash)

Indie, "A" and "AA" gaming on PC is absolutely wonderful. There are dozens of good titles for most genres. There are proper remakes of classics (albeit sometimes not the same IP). The only thing lacking is time to play them.
 

polydiol

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hardware such as video cards and power supplies - yes
software - video games and such unless you throw money at EA, nope.
 

M76

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How games perform on average GPUs is most important to them; the fringe high end is after thought.
Not quite, the fringe high end is even more important because that's where the enthusiasts lie. The most loud people, and the people who will review the games. The people with audiences.

Just as car manufacturers don't make their profit from luxury cars, but affordable family carriers. But that's where their brand image is built. They need the luxury market to sell more budget cars. It's the same in gaming.
 

Domingo

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Part of the issue with Japanese games is that the Japanese for the most part do not game on the PC. There are rape simulators, dating simulators, and hentai games but outside of that the PC is considered a joke there.

Handheld systems do better in Japan, so that is the focus of those developers. And a lot of console games there are "made to be played the way the creator intended", so you will get stuff like hard locked frame rates, hard locked aspect ratios and other stuff. They like it that way, and they are not about to let someone else trample on the artistic vision of the game.

Even for stuff that does exist on the PC for multiplatform like say Street Fighter, they won't play it on the PC, they will play the console version.

This isn't going to change. It's just a very different country where mobile gaming makes sense due to long work hours and long commutes, an active arcade video game café scene, and home gaming being something of a single player only type affair of stuff like Dragon Quest.

For Japanese centric games, the PC might as well not exist. Though all the perverted games are starting to come to the US.

True about the Japanese game market, but the major Japanese developers are making excellent PC ports these days. They know the US and European markets will buy them. Street Fighter, Tekken, Metal Gear, Devil May Cry, Resident Evil, Dark Souls 2 & 3, etc. are superior ports these days. That wasn't always the case. The 360/PS3 era is when everything turned around.
 

XvMMvX

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I love Retroarch. Its the only thing I've been doing on my PC lately.

When it first started I thought it was shit and would never take off compared to some of the other emulators; however, those guys have put a lot of work into it.

What is fun is playing an old game and its just as good as your remember, but you ever boot up a game and realize... good lord this game is shit? Lol. The reality is you probably played it because there wasn't steam, origin, or hell the internet to immediately change your game.
 

slurm

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Dark age for PC gaming currently, no.
Is it going downhill, absolutely.

With the introduction of microtransactions, paying for additional save slots, season passes, and other things, PC gaming dying a slow horrible nickel and dimed death.
 

Aix.

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Dark age for PC gaming currently, no.
Is it going downhill, absolutely.

With the introduction of microtransactions, paying for additional save slots, season passes, and other things, PC gaming dying a slow horrible nickel and dimed death.

Well there are two models and, while the goal is the same (get the money), I don't mind the free-to-play+mtx model when it's done right (i.e. when you can't buy in-game advantages). The buy-to-play+mtx (perfected by EA/Activision) is much less palatable.

But there's a reason the free-to-pay +microtransaction model continues to exist: it works. For example, when Valve made Team Fortress 2 free-to-play back in 2011 they reported revenue 12 times higher than when they were selling the game itself (https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/164922/GDC_2012_How_Valve_made_Team_Fortress_2_freetoplay.php).

Two of the primary games that I play use the above model: Grinding Gear Games' Path of Exile and Epic Games' Fortnite. Both are online-only multiplayer games and both, to date, have been well-served by their developers. The model is interesting in that you can play all you want for free, and if you feel like throwing some money the dev's way you're free to do so. If the game sucks or displeases you in some way then you can still play for free or stop playing entirely.

There are tons of people embarrassed or opposed to spending money on gaming based on the fact that we didn't have to in the past. I would bet that a lot of these same people would also expect lengthy support for the titles they have purchased. I look at Diablo 3 and Path of Exile: PoE has a lot more of my money, and that's the game that has delivered new content and support patches multiple times every year. I don't feel like we're in the dark ages right now, although there are a few practices I'd like to see reduced in usage - matchmaking in FPS games being the biggest.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Add League of Legends to the FTP list.

There are quite a few very large, successful ones, and as Aix. said above, I also don't mind them when it's 'free to play' and not 'pay to win'.
 

FearTheCow

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The drama queening on this is a little much. PC gaming isn't suddenly dying just because the most expensive, luxury GPU tier has been more expensive and hard to get for a few weeks. The many millions of GPUs purchased by gamers before January 2018 didn't just cease to exist.

If you bother to look at Steam stats and see the median GPU config, you'd realize it's nowhere near high end Pascal's anyway. Videogame developers do not target the extreme high end of GPUs, they target the median. Game developers are actually far more interested in getting their titles playable on intel IGP's, believe it or not, because that's where the massive install base is. How games perform on average GPUs is most important to them; the fringe high end is after thought.
Have you even checked pricing on everything but low end gpu's?
 

biggles

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The drama queening on this is a little much. PC gaming isn't suddenly dying just because the most expensive, luxury GPU tier has been more expensive and hard to get for a few weeks. The many millions of GPUs purchased by gamers before January 2018 didn't just cease to exist.

If you bother to look at Steam stats and see the median GPU config, you'd realize it's nowhere near high end Pascal's anyway. Videogame developers do not target the extreme high end of GPUs, they target the median. Game developers are actually far more interested in getting their titles playable on intel IGP's, believe it or not, because that's where the massive install base is. How games perform on average GPUs is most important to them; the fringe high end is after thought.
The problem is that even the mid tier gpu's are selling at inflated prices vs msrp. Good luck getting a 1060 at less than $100 over retail.
 

djoye

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 31, 2004
Messages
2,973
It's too bad about GPU prices, but I think that gaming on PC is better than ever.

Yes, micro-transactions and pay-2-win (skip the grind) sucks, don't buy those games if you don't agree with the practice; those games will go away if people stop giving them money (they won't and those games will never go away). On the positive side, I think we're seeing more games on PC that would otherwise have been console-only games and they're not junk ports. PC has always had unique games, but I feel like it's now getting everything else (except the obvious brand exclusives), and I think that's great because that just means I don't have to play it at 20-30 FPS on a console.

I have so many good single-player games in my Steam backlog that I refuse to believe there's a problem.
 

biggles

2[H]4U
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
2,152
I think the situation is bad for high end games. Example, 4k resolution. But good for old school and retro games. Stuff that requires low end hardware, integrated gpus.
 
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