Any compelling reasons to get a 6700k over a 5820k for contemporary builds?

StoleMyOwnCar

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One of my friends is building a new PC, and frankly I just told him that he'd be better off going with a 5820k rather than a 6700k at this point. It's cheaper and it's better at being a CPU considering it has more cores (although it might be on an older architecture?); not to mention from what I read they overclock like beasts. At least that was my reasoning. Before he does anything with his money, I wanna ask you people if there is any compelling reason to buy a 6700k over a 5820k. Maybe motherboard features? Are any of them noteworthy?
 

Dangman

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The main reason to buy the 6700K is if you're not overclocking at all and the user plans on doing tasks that don't require more than four cores/4 ~ 8 threads. The 6700K's 4Ghz clock speed allows for something like a 15% to 20% performance increase in single threaded or lightly threaded tasks over the the 5820K. Another reason that'll become more compelling in the next few months is lower overall costs due to the cheaper motherboards.

Obviously, if you are overclocking, the 5820K becomes a better choice at that point. IN addition, if you want to have a good idea of how reliable your PC will be, the X99 platform becomes a better choice at that point due to it being out longer. In addition, if you're already in the $200 range for motherboards, the X99 platform is the better sounding deal at that point.
 
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Unless he is running applications that can utilize more than 8 threads, the 6700k will be faster. Price wise, they are within a few dollars of each other. If this is mainly going to be a gaming PC then the 6700k is the better bet, particularity if he has a Microcenter close by. Now if he is planning on running 3 or 4 GPUs, then the 5820k might be a better bet because of the larger number of PCI-E lanes.
 

HardLiner

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5820k doesn't have the extra lanes

I could be wrong but doesn't the 6700k have 20 lanes and the 5800k have 28? With the higher end haswell CPU's having 40?

I have been debating this too, I think I will either go 5820k or wait next year for the new processors to come out.
 

Dangman

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5820k doesn't have the extra lanes

I could be wrong but doesn't the 6700k have 20 lanes and the 5800k have 28? With the higher end haswell CPU's having 40?

I have been debating this too, I think I will either go 5820k or wait next year for the new processors to come out.
The 5820K has 28 PCI-E Lanes:
http://ark.intel.com/products/82932/Intel-Core-i7-5820K-Processor-15M-Cache-up-to-3_60-GHz

However, the 6700K only has 16 PCI-E Lanes:
http://ark.intel.com/products/88195/Intel-Core-i7-6700K-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-4_20-GHz

So yes, the 5820K has the extra PCI-E lanes.
 

StoleMyOwnCar

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Well, it seems like games are utilizing more and more threads, right? I thought we were also getting software improvements eventually which would allow easier utilization of more cores. I think if overclocked (which again I've heard they overclock very easily), wouldn't the 5820k easily be a better CPU for both present and future? Granted I haven't looked at 6700k overclocking results at all, so maybe they overclock well.

Good point about motherboard prices, I did hear that the 5820k's platform is a tad expensive. Though I think many of the motherboards have more luxuries to compensate. I noticed some of them have 2 front USB3.0 connectors, which is pretty nice to have.

What do the newest platform's motherboards have as differentiating features?
 

alex.rizea

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I think there is no upgrade performance wise in changing the 5820k for a 6700k. Only if you need the extra features of the Z170 chipset.
 

defaultluser

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The main reason to buy the 6700K is if you're not overclocking at all and the user plans on doing tasks that don't require more than four cores/4 ~ 8 threads. The 6700K's 4Ghz clock speed allows for something like a 15% to 20% performance increase in single threaded or lightly threaded tasks over the the 5820K. Another reason that'll become more compelling in the next few months is lower overall costs due to the cheaper motherboards.

Specifically, this B150 MSI motherboard for $85 ($75 after rebate):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128874

Has everything the Z170 does except for overclocking and multi-GPU. Even includes an m.2 slot and Intel lan. The VRMs look very basic, but they should be enough.
 

Dangman

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Well, it seems like games are utilizing more and more threads, right? I thought we were also getting software improvements eventually which would allow easier utilization of more cores. I think if overclocked (which again I've heard they overclock very easily), wouldn't the 5820k easily be a better CPU for both present and future? Granted I haven't looked at 6700k overclocking results at all, so maybe they overclock well.

Good point about motherboard prices, I did hear that the 5820k's platform is a tad expensive. Though I think many of the motherboards have more luxuries to compensate. I noticed some of them have 2 front USB3.0 connectors, which is pretty nice to have.

What do the newest platform's motherboards have as differentiating features?
Largely dependent on whether or not the games you're planning to play do take advantage of multiple threads. Blizzard games aren't that heavily multi-threaded for example.

Nothing really. An extra USB 3.0 port or out of the box USB 3.1 support.
Specifically, this B150 MSI motherboard for $85 ($75 after rebate):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128874

Has everything the Z170 does except for overclocking and multi-GPU. Even includes an m.2 slot and Intel lan. The VRMs look very basic, but they should be enough.
Just to clarify what I meant: Right now, I can't really recommend cheaper LGA 1151 motherboards just yet considering that there's no real way to get an idea before hand just how reliable they are. That's not to say that all cheap motherboards are bad. There's plenty of cheap motherboards that are fairly solid but it did time time for that information to com up. It'll take some time and the efforts of early adopters before I feel comfortable recommending cheaper LGA 1151 motherboards.
 
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