Anthem Alpha Streamer Loses Entire EA Origin Library after Breaking NDA

NickJames

Supreme [H]ardness
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Apr 28, 2009
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6,675
I think I'd be very careful about concluding that because something happens often it is legal. YMMV.
Well until someone is punished for it then that's the case. Innocent until proven guilty and such. Problem is no one has the legal capacity or financial situation to fight something like this.
 

Ranulfo

2[H]4U
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Feb 9, 2006
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I missed the invite by a couple of days. I didn't even see the invite email and they gave you one day to respond and sign up.
 

Xrave

Supreme [H]ardness
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Jun 29, 2004
Messages
7,119
Losing all your games is probably cheaper than getting sued
 

Dan_D

Extremely [H]
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Feb 9, 2002
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56,644
What the fuck? People are fucking retarded. What part of "Non-Disclosure Agreement" did this moron not understand?
 
Joined
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Well since he did break the NDA, they could sue him and let him keep his original games.

That would be fair :)
 

Armenius

Fully [H]
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Jan 28, 2014
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ea probably knows anthems a turd. They don't want the interwebs finding out, imperative to keep the idiots buying pre-orders, dlc packs and season passes.
There is a publically available demo coming out February 1, so everyone is going to find out at that point. I don't get you people blowing your load over an alpha (i.e. not even feature complete).
 

PantherBlitz

Limp Gawd
Joined
Apr 14, 2011
Messages
421
You should create a corporation and buy all your games through that. Since corporations never die, you can "give" the games to who ever you want after you die... As it stands now, when you die, your account is closed.
Unfortunately estate tax laws prohibit this to some extent. That's why estate planners set up all sorts of trusts and foundations; and why gifts over a certain amount are taxable to the gift giver.

But realistically, for something small like a games library its more practical to just give your password to a family member before you cross the River Styx.
 

Delicieuxz

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 11, 2016
Messages
1,159
You should create a corporation and buy all your games through that. Since corporations never die, you can "give" the games to who ever you want after you die... As it stands now, when you die, your account is closed.
Actually, Valve honours willed instructions to give a Steam account to another person, and I imagine it is the same for all other platforms. I imagine there would arise legal problems if they didn't, since people to own the games they've purchased through Steam and similar platforms and the only way that companies like Valve can keep any pretense otherwise is by avoiding or warding-off a legal confrontation over the matter. Also, I expect that an attorney executing a will isn't going to simply accept a refusal of account transfer when the mythos surrounding item ownership regarding games isn't an experienced thing outside of gaming hobbyists. An estate attorney would probably respond with a 'wtf' and 'no'' to the platform operator and I'm thinking probably be obliged to challenge any obstruction to carrying out the will, and so I'm sure platform operators will comply with any willed account transfer to avoid those issues.
 

DocNo

Gawd
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Messages
654
Interesting. Though, I'm not sure claiming to be able to take a person's possessions for such a violation would stand in a court as being reasonable. I think EA is acting beyond what is reasonable.
Reasonable in this context doesn't mean what you think it does. In contract law it all comes down to the terms and conditions of the contracts in dispute, if he's foolish enough to try to dispute this.

There's no possessions to take; you don't own software - not even open source software. It's licensed for your use. Violate the terms of the license and you loose the right to use the software. Want something completely unfettered? It's called public domain. If it isn't in the public domain then there are strings attached. With some open source wonks it's so they can "enforce" freedom. WTF? Talk about irony...

Anyway, in the days of physical media you had the illusion of "ownership" of the digital bits, but it was always that - an illusion.

This guy doesn't have a leg to stand on. If he had an extensive EA library then it's probably a tough lesson to learn. Being an adult is hard and contract terms and conditions also matter, not feelings. Next time he agrees to be bound by terms and conditions I guess he should, you know, honor them.
 

ZodaEX

2[H]4U
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Sep 17, 2004
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3,729
So do what I do and only buy physical games with re-sale value. You can't loose all of your games at once if they aren't all tied to the same account.
 

singe_101

2[H]4U
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Dec 17, 2005
Messages
2,135
If you get a screener disc don't stream it on Twitch. Or if you go to a screening of a movie a month before the release date and don't even tweet about it.
 

86 5.0L

Supreme [H]ardness
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Nov 13, 2006
Messages
6,977
I understand them revoking his alpha privileges and even blacklisting him from future alpha/beta access, but taking the shit he’s already paid for? That’s fucked, and should be illegal.
Is this one of those “you paid for a license” and can be revoked at any time things? I feel like it is.
 

Darunion

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
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I guess you haven't been gaming on PC for a while now...
I was gonna say, what was the last non-authenticated game? Not that I like it, but that trend of physical only games that could be resold train left the station long ago.
 

Armenius

Fully [H]
Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
22,819
I was gonna say, what was the last non-authenticated game? Not that I like it, but that trend of physical only games that could be resold train left the station long ago.
I think GTR 2 was the last game I owned on PC that didn't require online authentication. It was still using disc authentication with SecuROM, if I'm not mistaken. It came out in 2006.
 
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