Almost Half Of All TSA Employees Have Been Cited For Misconduct

Megalith

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A recent report from the House Homeland Security Commission states that nearly half of the TSA’s 60,000 employees have been cited for misconduct in recent years. Citations have increased 28.5 percent from 2013 to 2015, and in 2015, the average U.S. airport received 58 complaints each year—more than one a week.

Perhaps even worse? The outcomes of these misconduct allegations. Findings from the six-month-long investigation show that from fiscal year 2013 to 2015, the number of investigations opened and closed decreased by 15 percent and 28 percent, respectively. TSA increased the use of non-disciplinary actions by almost 80 percent, while it decreased the use of disciplinary actions by 14 percent. Put simply, this means the TSA has offered fewer (and lesser) punishments, and has instead sought to treat the misconduct with "more counseling and letters that explain why certain behaviors were not acceptable."
 

Jim Kim

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Isn't sifting through other peoples dirty undies punishment enough.
Talk about a rewarding job.
 

SvenBent

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is it really a surpriae that teaching the understanding or right and wrongs, has better results than punishment?
 

EODetroit

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That article is trash. TSA agents are too low paid and the agency doesn't have the means to replace the agents if they punished or fired every mistake. And as SvenBent says, teaching and training is more effective than punishment, anyways.
 

Merc1138

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That article is trash. TSA agents are too low paid and the agency doesn't have the means to replace the agents if they punished or fired every mistake. And as SvenBent says, teaching and training is more effective than punishment, anyways.
Sure, but ideally they'd all just be laid off as having an agency filled with underpaid and incompetent staff makes the whole thing pretty useless. Even as "security theater" the TSA's reputation is so poor that they're a joke anyway.
 

nightfly

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I get the feeling that a lot of the TSA workers came out of the unemployment line, so they're just trying to do their job and go home, like most of the rest of us. So they're probably not the brightest bunch, and if a self important boss complains to them, they over react to keep the boss happy. Which probably isn't possible. Government managers are usually miserably low paid as well.
 

tetris42

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my-first-cavity-search.jpg
 

Lith1um

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Since we're talking about misconduct of government law enforcement agencies, anyone think it's fucked up that the government keeps accurate statistics of how many law enforcement officers are killed on the job, but the government does not maintain any statistics on how many civilians are killed by law enforcement?

List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Listed below are lists of people killed by law enforcement in the United States, whether in the line of duty or not, and regardless of reason or method. Inclusion in the lists implies neither wrongdoing nor justification on the part of the person killed or the officer involved. The listing merely documents the occurrence of a death.

These lists are incomplete. Although Congress instructed the Attorney General in 1994 to compile and publish annual statistics on police use of excessive force, this was never carried out, and the FBI does not collect these data either.[1] The annual average number of justifiable homicides alone was previously estimated to be near 400.[2] Updated estimates from the Bureau of Justice Statistics released in 2015 estimate the number to be around 930 per year, or 1240 if assuming that nonreporting local agencies kill people at the same rate as reporting agencies.[3] The Washington Post has tracked shootings (only) since 2015, reporting 990 shootings in that year,[4] and more than 250 by the end of March 2016.[5]

One day man will create a technology which allows the US Attorney General's office to comply with the 1994 instructions from Congress regarding this matter. /END SARCASM

Government data collection[edit]

Through the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, specifically Section 210402, the U.S. Congress mandated that the attorney general collect data on the use of excessive force by police and publish an annual report from the data.[13] However, the bill lacked provisions for enforcement.[14] In part due to the lack of participation from state and local agencies, the Bureau of Justice Statistics stopped keeping count in March 2014.[15]

Two national systems collect data that include homicides committed by law enforcement officers in the line of duty. The National Center for Health Statistics maintains the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS), which aggregates data from locally filed death certificates. State laws require that death certificates be filed with local registrars, but the certificates do not systematically document whether a killing was legally justified nor whether a law enforcement officer was involved.[16]

The FBI maintains the Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR), which relies on state and local law enforcement agencies voluntarily submitting crime reports.[16] A study of the years 1976 to 1998 found that both national systems underreport justifiable homicides by police officers, but for different reasons.[16] In addition, between 2007 and 2012, more than 550 homicides by the country's 105 largest law enforcement agencies were missing from FBI records.[17]

Records in the NVSS did not consistently include documentation of police officer involvement. The UCR database did not receive reports of all applicable incidents. The authors concluded that "reliable estimates of the number of justifiable homicides committed by police officers in the United States do not exist."[16] A study of killings by police from 1999 to 2002 in the Central Florida region found that the national databases included (in Florida) only one-fourth of the number of persons killed by police as reported in the local news media.[18]"Nationally, the percentage of unreported killings by police is probably lower than among agencies in Central Florida..."[18]

The Death In Custody Reporting Act required states to report individuals who die in police custody. It was active without enforcement provisions from 2000 to 2006 and restored in December 2014, amended to include enforcement through withdrawal of federal funding for noncompliant departments.[14]

An additional bill requiring all American law enforcement agencies to report killings by their officers was introduced in the U.S. Senate in June 2015.[19]

According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), based on data from medical examiners and coroners, killings by law enforcement officers (not including legal executions) was the most distinctive cause of death in Nevada, New Mexico, and Oregon between 2001 and 2010. In these states, the rate of killings by law enforcement officers were higher above national averages than any other cause of death considered.[20][21] The database used to generate those statistics, the CDC WONDER Online Database, has a U.S. total of 5,511 deaths by "Legal Intervention" for the years 1999-2013 (3,483 for the 2001-2010 used to generate the report) excluding the subcategory for legal execution.[22]
 

collegeboy69us

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hire shitty people... get shitty results.

Would anyone really expect someone who only knows how to flip burgers, stand around, etc... would magically perform better in a position where they had some form of power and or responsibility?
 

termite

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TSA is a good idea that was horrifically executed by an inept government. The glaring issues with TSA gaurds is that they are just unqualified security guards, and get paid about as much. Couple that with the fact they are government employees, who are practically unfireable and you have a recipe for the stupid shit that TSA employees do.
 
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I would expect a lot of the misconduct relates to using sick leave as vacation time. That seems to be ongoing issue with many TSA agents. I'll bet most of the infractions are not performance based but more mundane issues.
 

haste.

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My recent experiences with TSA have been positive. I flew a handful of times during the TEN HOUR WAIT media bs this summer and never had a problem getting through security almost immediately. Plus they seem like they are trying to be at least somewhat friendly.

The only hold up was one time the body scanner popped up a yellow dot...
the TSA agent had me turn around and look at the screen cause he was laughing, followed by "I'm gonna have to check that out"...
Guess where the yellow dot was? He was polite and gentle and offered me a smoke after.

He actually did everything in his power to not fondle me and just checked the inner thigh but it was still pretty funny - my wife was nearly rolling when she saw my face after I saw the dot. But I'm a good sport and said go for it.
 

madcap magician

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I travel all over the world and the only place where I've seen better airport screening is in the UK. As mush as we hate TSA, they do quite well with what they have. As far as not getting paid enough, that's all relative. The biggest problem is getting qualified candidates that can pass the secret clearance and THAT IS WHY they choose to do retraining instead of firing. My 2 cents.
 

Inglix_the_Mad

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Aug 5, 2004
Messages
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TSA? Worthless.

There can never be another 9/11 style attack, ever. Before that, for decades, people were taught to sit down and shut up during a hijacking. The plane will eventually land and the perps caught or killed. You literally were told, don't do anything stupid.

After 9/11, do you think anyone is going to stay in their seat if they aren't a young child, extremely elderly, or infirm? Hell no. Everyone, even if there is a gun, is going to try and take the terrorist(s) out. It will not happen again. All 9/11 did was reprogram passengers to expect the worst.
 

Wolf_Tech

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Sep 19, 2010
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TSA it really not needed anymore. The steps taken after 9/11 is enough. The secure cockpit doors, The Armed police per flight, and The new intel agency. The security we had before 9/11 was plenty enough. The TSA is just a waste of tax payers dollars.
 

Axiomatic

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Jun 10, 2004
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The TSA is culling from the same herd that produces Comcast customer service agents and the lady that hates you at the DMV. These are not geniuses. Just middle class joes. Expecting them to foil terrorism is kind of like letting the wolves watch the sheep.
 
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