AC Routers, am I missing something?

Pylor

Limp Gawd
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I was looking for an AC router/AP for my apartment, as the 2.4ghz frequency my Asus RT-N16 is restricted to is horribly congested and near useless for anything but a youtube video and light browsing. Most of them seem to be in the ~$150 range, which is about as much as I paid for my last two routers combined. I stumbled upon the Rosewill RNX-AC750RT, and I'm wondering just what differences I'm missing that separates it from something akin to the ASUS RT-AC66U. The only 2 differences I can see is in regards to speed and current firmware capabilities. I see the speed on the RT-AC66U, and I can only assume they're using some sort of channel banding to send across multiple channels. Or is there some new technology that I'm not aware of? I'm not a huge fan of channel banding as it seems like it just increases congestion.

The second difference is the firmware. The rosewill comes with stock firmware, while the ASUS comes with some sort of slightly-homebrewed version of DD-WRT. It looks like the rosewill RNX-AC750RT is a relatively new router, so I can't really discern if it's just too new to have a DD-WRT release or if it's completely incompatible based on the specs. For an AP, I think stock firmware would be fine with me. This thing would sit behind my RT-N16.

I can see 34 wireless signals in my apartment, only 5 of which are on the 5ghz band. I'm assuming anything going over 5ghz would be a huge increase.
 

Climber

Supreme [H]ardness
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Your rt-n16 is an n speed router while the AC routers are the new AC class. So newer technology and higher speed if you have AC class devices. If not no need to grab an AC router to use as an AC. Just find another n class router an set that up as your ap.

The 5ghz band isn't just on AC class routers. There are several good n class dual band routers and Asus routers can use asusmerlin firmware rather than stock. Just be aware that 5ghz is great up close but the farther away and the more walls between you and the router the worse the signal gets.
 

QwertyJuan

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Your rt-n16 is an n speed router while the AC routers are the new AC class. So newer technology and higher speed if you have AC class devices. If not no need to grab an AC router to use as an AC. Just find another n class router an set that up as your ap.

The 5ghz band isn't just on AC class routers. There are several good n class dual band routers and Asus routers can use asusmerlin firmware rather than stock. Just be aware that 5ghz is great up close but the farther away and the more walls between you and the router the worse the signal gets.

Was just going to say this... 5Ghz penetration is TERRIBLE. Works great if you are in the same room as the router... but that's about it.
 

Pylor

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I figured I'd grab an AC router so I don't have to upgrade when that becomes the new standard for devices. It's really more of an AP than anything (and a cheap one). I don't need it to do anything except act as a switch for my current router, as I prefer the flexibility I currently have. I'm just curious if there's anything besides the channel banding and firmware that would make someone more inclined to go with the ASUS for 3x the money.

5Ghz may be awful, but when there's about 15 2.4ghz APs blasting away within 50 yards of me the lack of noise on 5ghz will be a huge boon. I currently have an 900 square foot apartment, it doesn't need to go very far, it just needs to be heard over the noise.
 
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devman

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Was just going to say this... 5Ghz penetration is TERRIBLE. Works great if you are in the same room as the router... but that's about it.

I have an Archer C7 on the bottom floor of my 3 story townhouse. The 5GHz signal propagates just fine to the top floor, and through walls. While the signal strength isn't as good as 2.4GHz that is far offset by the fact that the noise floor for 5GHz is much much lower in most cases. In my particular case I have the only 5Ghz wifi signal around me, 2.4GHz is congested as hell.
 

Climber

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If you are looking for an AC router for "future proofing" I'd suggest an ac1900 series instead. Not much more for considerable more bang than a 750.
 

Anemone

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5 GHz signal is getting 520Mbps 2 floors up and 650-800 one floor up. Sure beats the pants off of 3x3 N speeds.
 

Pylor

Limp Gawd
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If you are looking for an AC router for "future proofing" I'd suggest an ac1900 series instead. Not much more for considerable more bang than a 750.


Doing a search on newegg for an AC1900 router shows a bunch ~$150. The Rosewill one that I bought was $55. Almost 3x the price for an AC-1900. Can someone tell me the difference between AC750 and AC1900? Is it just channel banding and taking up more of the wireless spectrum?

Edit: I actually switched my order out for a C7 since it's only $35 more. I figure 3 external 5ghz antennas and 3 internal 2.4ghz antennas are worth it for the money.
 
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QwertyJuan

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Not sure how you guys get the 5Ghz penetration you do... congratulations... I guess? :confused:
 

Mackintire

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5 GHz signal is getting 520Mbps 2 floors up and 650-800 one floor up. Sure beats the pants off of 3x3 N speeds.

Stick on steel build maybe?


Also keep in mind that the negotiated data rate is NOT your throughput rating.

802.11ac has some neat tricks that give benefits to wireless N user's as well. But you need to have reasonable expectations. Smallnetbuilder has gobs of articles on this topic.

Practice some google fu then come back and ask more specific questions.
 
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