A Map of the Entire Internet, 1977

CommanderFrank

Cat Can't Scratch It
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Not too many of us were hanging out on the Internet back in 1977, matter of fact if you weren’t networked into ARPANET, there was no Internet to hang out on. Check out the simplicity of the 1977 map and think ahead to what it would take to make a map of the 2013 Internet. A whole lot has changed in just 37 short years.
 

BugSmashR

n00b
Joined
Jan 31, 2008
Messages
8
Why am I not surprised to see that the agency thats been in the news lately is already on the network in 1977, just above and left of the pentagon. (Hi guys!)
 

Kaitian

Supreme [H]ardness
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Aug 12, 2008
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A time where it was porn free until some genius came up with ASCII porn.
 

Jagger100

Supreme [H]ardness
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Oct 31, 2004
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Why am I not surprised to see that the agency thats been in the news lately is already on the network in 1977, just above and left of the pentagon. (Hi guys!)

The internet was started for the Military. The NSA works for the military. Why would this be a surprise?
Oh wait, the internet has been an NSA conspiracy from the beginning.
:eek:
 

Mchart

Supreme [H]ardness
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The 'ARPANET' was only made public as the 'internet' because the US government allowed it as such. Obviously, they knew in the future that they could do what they are doing now.

True 'freedom' on the internet has never, and will never exist. It has always been, and will always be a tool for the military.
 

kbrickley

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The 'ARPANET' was only made public as the 'internet' because the US government allowed it as such. Obviously, they knew in the future that they could do what they are doing now.

True 'freedom' on the internet has never, and will never exist. It has always been, and will always be a tool for the military.

Well, paranoia aside, the Military SHOULD use all the tools at its disposal or it isn't doing its job ;) ... that said, the commercial internet we have today is far more of a tool for the corporations than the Military (as it should be) ...

anarchy is great (which is what most people claiming the internet should be "free" want), but isn't always in the interests of a capitalist society as we have ... people have more venues than ever to express themselves via the net and that is unlikely to change ... however, freedom of expression doesn't extend to virtual abuse of others (libel or slander) or misusing protected materials (copyright/patent violations, plagerism) or violation of accepted societal standards for the community they are in (snuff videos, child porn, etc) ... the internet is a powerful tool and as the great Stan Lee said, "with great power comes great responsibility) :cool:
 

beowulf7

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 30, 2005
Messages
10,433
That's a slightly more complex ARPANET than I was expecting for 36 years ago.

I saw ASCII porn for the first time in '76 or early '77 so it was probably done even before that.
Does this qualify as ASCII porn?

===()
 

Ur_Mom

Fully [H]
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May 15, 2006
Messages
20,560
In all honesty, knowing what we know now, this wouldn't surprise me.

This may be true to an extent, but I don't think anyone could every predict that it would grow as fast and as big as it did. I think once it started growing, the NSA got some massive hard-ons.

I don't expect privacy on the internet. It's a public network and I'm using other peoples servers to do things. I just don't like my own government using these same servers against me. Advertisers, the server owners, etc., I expect to use that information to benefit them.
 

Heavy_Nova

Lurker
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
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By "satellite" circuits are they referring to connections via space-borne satellites or remote locations? If space-borne I wonder what kind of speeds they were getting back in 1977 o_O...
 

Ur_Mom

Fully [H]
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By "satellite" circuits are they referring to connections via space-borne satellites or remote locations? If space-borne I wonder what kind of speeds they were getting back in 1977 o_O...

When did T1 speeds come out? I know a lot of those early connections were 56k, tops.

Weird that the backbone of the internet used to be 56k links.... I wonder if they were limited by other factors (hard drive speeds, CPU, etc.) at any time. Some people would be HDD limited on Gb internet these days. With 10Gb, most (if not all) desktop PC's would be toast. I can't wait to see in 25-30 years how things have changed and people laugh at Google's push into 1 Gb connections. :D
 

SunnyD

2[H]4U
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Messages
3,156
By "satellite" circuits are they referring to connections via space-borne satellites or remote locations? If space-borne I wonder what kind of speeds they were getting back in 1977 o_O...

US to London isn't happening terrestrially at all. Nor is US mainland to Hawaii.
 

sed8em

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 2, 2007
Messages
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Even more impressive is that there's a couple UNIVAC's still in operation on that map.

Just out of curiosity, why?
What purpose are they serving? As an antique showpiece? Or as a functional piece of hardware to this day?
 

DonDon

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Sep 17, 2000
Messages
1,584
My Dad fixed computers for IBM from 59 to 93. What a change for that Old Coot.

I loved the stories him and his buddies had of the original System 1 running at Khz speeds with 16k memory expansion options. Tape storage. Drum storage. Punched cards. Wow, it is amazing we got to the Moon.

Strangely enough, I do not see IBM on that map yet. Some Universities, several Air Force Bases, and some big time manufacturers in the day.

I know a lot of systems communicated by 30 BPS teletype back in that time frame. 300 baud modems were the next big thing.

Don
 

BinarySynapse

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
15,103
When did T1 speeds come out? I know a lot of those early connections were 56k, tops.

Weird that the backbone of the internet used to be 56k links.... I wonder if they were limited by other factors (hard drive speeds, CPU, etc.) at any time. Some people would be HDD limited on Gb internet these days. With 10Gb, most (if not all) desktop PC's would be toast. I can't wait to see in 25-30 years how things have changed and people laugh at Google's push into 1 Gb connections. :D

T1 rolled out in the early sixties, but ARPANET never implemented it. They stayed with analog leased lines until it was decommissioned in 1990.

NSFNET (the spiritual successor to ARPANET) upgraded to T1 in the late 80's, then T3 in 1992. It was decommissioned in 1995 when commercial backbones took on all Internet traffic.
 

Qinsp

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Messages
2,154
My Dad fixed computers for IBM from 59 to 93. What a change for that Old Coot.

I loved the stories him and his buddies had of the original System 1 running at Khz speeds with 16k memory expansion options. Tape storage. Drum storage. Punched cards. Wow, it is amazing we got to the Moon.

Strangely enough, I do not see IBM on that map yet. Some Universities, several Air Force Bases, and some big time manufacturers in the day.

I know a lot of systems communicated by 30 BPS teletype back in that time frame. 300 baud modems were the next big thing.

Don

Modems sat on a desk. They had two cups. You put the old style phone handset in it. OPPSS!! Turn it around idiot! You dialed with 4 fingers of one hand (wheel) if you were good. 110 baud was default teletype, and you could out type it.

Hollerith cards (punchcards) are why our text boxes still have 80 char across. That's how many punch holes there are across.

There are lots of IBM's on the list. See System 360/370. These were the big dawgs. PDP11's were mini-computers. No desktops, all were timeshare. No monitors in general. The computer terminals were Teletype or IBM Selectric electric typewriters.
 

Qinsp

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Messages
2,154
HDD's had removable platters and big ones looked like washing machines. The disks were enclosed in a protective plastic housings, and took awhile to get up to temp and speed. Tape drivers are always sequential access. Good riddance to them. If your data was at beginning, it sucked to be you.
 
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