4TB Seagate internal green $140 through 4/22

Discussion in '[H]ot|DEALS' started by 73ChargerFan, Apr 22, 2014.

  1. 73ChargerFan

    73ChargerFan [H]Lite

    Messages:
    123
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
  2. /dev/null

    /dev/null [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    14,196
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2001
    Nice deal. I'm waiting for the 6G drives to come down in price :D
     
  3. Ultima99

    Ultima99 [H]ardness Supreme

    Messages:
    4,890
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2004
    Woot, massive storage capacity in a high failure rate mfg!
     
  4. Megalith

    Megalith 24-bit/48kHz Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,004
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
  5. munkle

    munkle [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    11,195
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    I'm running 2 3tb seagates right now for about 1 year, no issues yet. My only drive to ever fail was a hitachi which had bad sectors out of the box (unfortunatly I didn't use the drive till a 6 months later so I couldn't return it, but hitachi replaced it).


    I bought one as I need more storage.
     
  6. DPI

    DPI Nitpick Police

    Messages:
    10,960
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    FUD detected.
     
  7. cortexodus

    cortexodus [H]ard|Gawd

    Messages:
    1,614
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
  8. munkle

    munkle [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    11,195
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    According to that article the 4tb is just as reliable as wd so yes fud.
     
  9. /dev/null

    /dev/null [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    14,196
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2001
  10. MavericK

    MavericK Zero Cool

    Messages:
    28,923
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Interesting, I didn't realize Hitachi had become so reliable (after the whole Deathstar debacle).
     
  11. DPI

    DPI Nitpick Police

    Messages:
    10,960
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Helps to know the history. "Deathstar" hasn't been a thing since before Hitachi bought out IBM.

    But why let that get in the way of regurgitating "Deathstar" for the next 13 years like mindless sheep
     
  12. cortexodus

    cortexodus [H]ard|Gawd

    Messages:
    1,614
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Funnily enough I still have a completely functional 400GB "Deathstar" drive but it bears the legend "non-essential data only" on the label in sharpie because I had replaced so many Hitachi drives during that time-frame. It runs hotter than hell.

    That may be, but if there is any basis to my assessment of a correlation between platter count and failure rates (I don't know if there actually is any solid data on that, it's just my experience) it would make me hesitant to purchase. Considering those 6TB drives from WD have 7x platters (the new fancy helium-filled ones) and the Seagate is estimated to be 6x 1TB platters, I'd say that's an awful lot of potential failure points for both manufacturer's drives. Time will tell, of course :)
     
  13. BurntToast

    BurntToast 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    3,672
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2003
    That's not a Deathstar. They didn't make a 400GB 75GXP. The Deskstar line has been around for ages. I had a 75GB drive, that thing was a beast! the 2MB Cache over the standard 512KB seemed like a a HUGE benefit. But like most, mine eventually failed :/
     
  14. cortexodus

    cortexodus [H]ard|Gawd

    Messages:
    1,614
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Just going off the drive's name is all :) It's a Deskstar K7400 400GB. Shortly after it came out I had several pissed off customers in my shop with that same drive so it's just been surprising to me that it has kept kicking for so long. It's an RMA unit that I got in return for one of the bad ones, too!
     
  15. Kenworth

    Kenworth 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    2,141
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    With average age of 0.3 years for the 4tb drives. Seagate 3tb after 1.4 years with a 9.8% failure rate and 1.5tb after 3.8 years is at 25.4% failure rate. "The non-LP 7200 RPM drives have been consistently unreliable. Their failure rate is high, especially as they’re getting older." That is from the original article.
     
  16. Ducman69

    Ducman69 [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    10,445
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2007
    Meh, as long as the warranty is good who cares? All hard drives fail, period, so you have to plan for it. Implement proper RAID and when a disk fails under warranty you simply have it swapped out. Big deal.
     
  17. Megalith

    Megalith 24-bit/48kHz Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,004
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    So when these drives fail, does it usually happen immediately or will the user see clear signs of degradation?
     
  18. drescherjm

    drescherjm [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    14,472
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    There are a few studies that say its unpredictable in the general case. However for the 75 or so drives I have RMA'd here at work nearly all of them showed signs of failure in the SMART data (not overall pass /fail but raw data) days to weeks before the drive failed. I do realize my sample is way too small to be statistically significant. Perhaps I have been on a lucky streak..
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2014
  19. Kenworth

    Kenworth 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    2,141
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    As long as your time is worth less than the extra money it takes to possibly mitigate the issue to begin with, sure.
     
  20. ToddW2

    ToddW2 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    4,019
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
  21. 73ChargerFan

    73ChargerFan [H]Lite

    Messages:
    123
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Warranties are no good anymore unless you spend twice the price for server class drives.
     
  22. needmorecarnitine

    needmorecarnitine [H]ardness Supreme

    Messages:
    4,605
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2004

    what does that mean?
     
  23. Lateralus

    Lateralus More [H]uman than Human

    Messages:
    14,536
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Sure, they're not as good these days on consumer drives, but the big takeaway point is to have some sort of backup plan or redundancy if you value your data. People like to quote failure rates and are scared of filling these big drives up because of the possibility of losing all of that data. Well, this is a computer tech forum. Everyone should ask themselves "Would it bother me to lose the data that I'm storing on this drive?" If the answer is yes, and that drive is the only existing copy of that data, then you're a fool on borrowed time waiting on an accident to happen. Anyone here with common sense isn't afraid of buying a 4-6TB drive because either the data is expendable or they have some type of backup/redundancy in place to safeguard against it.

    Probably referring to the overall industry shift from 3-5 year warranties on consumer drives to mostly 1-3 year warranties. Enterprise drives still get the long warranties but they are big $$$.
     
  24. Ducman69

    Ducman69 [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    10,445
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2007
    Yup, just set it up in RAID 5, voila.
     
  25. /dev/null

    /dev/null [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    14,196
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2001
  26. viscountalpha

    viscountalpha 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    2,545
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2011
    buy a cheap drive, you get what you pay for.
     
  27. ///AMG

    ///AMG 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    3,157
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    I dont have any working seagate drives left anymore after 4 of them failed within the last 2 years. Most of them were only a year old and only used as backups. The new HDDs I have are all Toshiba and no problems so far. This would be a great deal had seagate not given me so many shitty drives.
     
  28. topcat989

    topcat989 Hamarabe Lover

    Messages:
    17,856
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2001
    until the array packs up on you and you lose all the data on all the drives;)

    this is why I love unRAID
     
  29. drescherjm

    drescherjm [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    14,472
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    This is a good way to lose all of your data at once.
     
  30. DPI

    DPI Nitpick Police

    Messages:
    10,960
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Slow Unraid is still limited to one parity disk (RAID5), yes? SnapRAID can do up to 6 parity disks per raidset.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2014
  31. Tengis

    Tengis [H]ardness Supreme

    Messages:
    4,799
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    I use SnapRaid... its legit.
     
  32. Ducman69

    Ducman69 [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    10,445
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2007
    Im approaching old-man age and haven't had an issue to date. Then again, anything of import is also backed up on the server I setup for my folks.
     
  33. jmilcher

    jmilcher [H]ardness Supreme

    Messages:
    4,296
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Ironic to me. I just had a brand new Toshiba drive die after 3 months of light use. Ive never lost a hard drive like this in 15+ years. All of my seagates are still operational. But thats just my experience.
     
  34. Catboxer

    Catboxer [H]ard|Gawd

    Messages:
    1,045
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2003
    RAID-1 and cloud storage for me.

    I Just got 2 3TB greens after 4 years of use from 2 1TB greens. One of the new 3TB drives was DOA, or at least did not live through initialization.

    Put a new one in, rebuilt array, all set.
     
  35. Jomanscool2

    Jomanscool2 Limp Gawd

    Messages:
    348
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    I've been using 6x Seagate 3TB drives for a year and a half now in a software (MDADM on Debian Stable) RAID-10 configuration, and it has worked wonders for me. Not a single drive has had any issues thus far, although I have performed a practice rebuild for safety. My problem now is my case is full, my 8.2TB formatted is almost full, and I don't really feel like getting a SATA port multiplier case for another 6 drive raid array, despite me designing my build a year and a half ago ago to support one :)
     
  36. Tengis

    Tengis [H]ardness Supreme

    Messages:
    4,799
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    My main reason for using SnapRaid is that I can add more storage or an extra parity drive on the fly.
     
  37. play2lose

    play2lose Gawd

    Messages:
    580
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Normally I wouldn't buy into a myth like this, it could all be just the randomness of statistics...but out of the ~10 hard drives I've had over the years, only 2 have gone bad. Both were the only Seagates I've ever had (An 80GB seagate barracuda back when that was standard size, lasted a year...and currently I'm getting bad unrecoverable sectors on a 1TB Seagate, lasted a few years)

    None of the rest have gone bad yet or show any warning signs (WD's and a few hitachi's) Knock on wood!
     
  38. drescherjm

    drescherjm [H]ardForum Junkie

    Messages:
    14,472
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    This sample size is statistically meaningless. You can draw statistically meaning full conclusions when you have thousands of hard drives not a few. Even my 200 is a very small sample size.