4690K and Seidon 120V

Syribo

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 9, 2008
Messages
1,515
I built this PC a month ago (All specs are in my signature), and almost immediately overclocked it to 4.2GHz with the voltage at 1.200, no issues since then Temps not bad, no lockups. I kinda wanted to try to push it a little more, though. So I'm at 4.4GHz with 1.200, seems stable so far. Wondering how others view my temps, though.

Idle, core temps are all 26-27C. While in game (FFXIV) temps are between about 37C-44C, also while streaming with OBS.

AIDA64 stress testing barely hits 70C. Now, when running Prime95 Blend, temps were in the 80s and got as high as 93C on one core for a little bit before I backed off and stopped it.. as that is a high temperature to me. I know Prime95 REALLY causes a lot of heat, and that the Haswell's also can produce a lot of heat, but does this seem okay in your opinions?

I'm not sure of the ambient temperature in my room, even, but the airflow is good, and it's not the least bit hot. I have a Corsait 760T case with 2 front intake, 3 top exhaust, one bottom intake, and my back/Seidon radiator fan is exhaust. I think the highest temps I've seen while just doing gaming, streaming, etc, is in the mid 50's, and that's if the windows are closed, it's humid or pretty warm (Now that it's Autumn, that won't really be a problem anymore.. I always keep my room very cool [We're talking windows open in the middle of winter here in NY]). While the stress testing temps scare me, I think that my temps while doing things seems okay, but want to know what others think.

Don't think I'm going to try 4.5GHz or above. I tried 4.5 at 1.200 and it wasn't stable. I want to see if I can stay at 1.200 :) I'm not an overclocker pro, I never did it until I built my first system back in 2008. Had no problems getting my Q6600 to 3.2GHz with barely a bump in the voltage.. so this is only my second time getting into overclocking my processor. I am more than happy with 4.4GHz, and even was happy at 4.2GHz. Especially at the voltage I'm at. Just hope my temps seem decent for my setup!

Edit: Ooh.. even with FFXIV running, streaming with OBS at 1080p, and running AIDA64 stress test, temps still not hitting 70C.
 
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Araxie

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
6,453
temps are fine... haswell does not like prime95 in any of their form... Even Asus does not recommend the use of prime with the new intel Haswell-E chips..

Raja@ASUS said:
I'd avoid using Prime95 28.5 on this platform unless you want to risk degrading your CPU. Most of the heat you see is generated by the AVX2 routines with small FFTs. Just because its hot, doesn't mean its useful for everything and will make your overclock bombproof because you passed hours of it smile.gif

Raja@ASUS said:
Praz nailed it really. The newer versions of Prime load in a way that they are only safe to run at near stock settings. The server processors actually downclock when AVX2 is detected to retain their TDP rating. On the desktop we're free to play and the thing most people don't know is how much current these routines can generate. It can be lethal for a CPU to see that level of current for prolonged periods.

As for the universal validity of various stability testing programs, that's a more difficult question to answer without using illustrations to simplify what occurs at the electrical level on some of the associated buses.

Being brief as possible and focusing on DRAM transfer as an example: Data is moved around the system in high and low logic or signal states. The timing of these systems and those that rely on them needs to be matched closely enough for data to be moved around and interpreted correctly.A burst of data may contain a series of 1s and 0s. The 1s pull more current as they require defined voltage level that is above 0. Each data pattern has a different effect on the timing margin. Some eat into the timing margin more than others (I may illustrate the theory of this in a future guide). If a given stress test does not generate patterns in a way that eats into the timing budget sufficiently to represent how the system is used, the stress test won't be as useful to the end-user.

That's why most stress test programs alternate between different data pattern types. Depending on how effective the rotation is, and how well that pattern causes issues for the system timing margin, it will, or will not, catch potential for instability. So it's wise not to hang one's hat on a single test type. Evaluate what your needs are from the system and try to run a variety of tools to ensure the system is stable in various ways. We also need to bear in mind that some stress tests only focus on a single part of the system, while others will impact multiple areas at once.

Seasoned users usually find a systematic way that leads them from stress tests that focus on individual areas to those that hit the entire system as part of their test regimen. Ultimately, this all comes down to what your requirements are and using enough testing to confirm reasonable stability for the system in its intended usage scenario.

We coded Realbench to generate stress with real-world apps. It's a useful tool for people that encode, render or crunch numbers with their systems. However, it's not the only method out there - there are many tools to evaluate system stability that are perfectly valid.

-Raja

so at the end you are fine, do not care about prime temps.. =)..
 

Syribo

[H]ard|Gawd
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Mar 9, 2008
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That's good to know :) I also just came across a spare Thermaltake 120mm fan I bought a few months ago for my old PC. Decided to put it on the Seidon's radiator in front, since I only had the one fan exhausting out the back. Just that alone seemed to have drop the temps at least 2C, which seems small but I'm happy with any drop haha. Also ordered one last set of the Corsair fans because this TT one has blue LEDs, and my case has all red ones ;) Gotta have it all matching.

I guess my OC is stable because I still have been stress testing and gaming and streaming, and no stability issues! Going to just stick with 4.4GHz with the 1.200 voltage and be happy.
 

vdragonlance

Limp Gawd
Joined
Dec 8, 2005
Messages
485
I have the same CPU/AIO setup but with a Corsair 120mm static pressure fan instead of the stock fan. Currently running @ 4.5ghz with 1.224 volts with idle temps in the mid 20s and load temps in the high 40s to mid 50s depending how hot the room is. Running Prime95 pushed the temps into the 90s as well before I shut it down.
I have a Corsair 230t with 2 Corsair SP 120mm fans up front, 2 Corsair AF 140mm fans up top and the SP 120 on the radiator.
 
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