40% of China’s Factories Shuttered in Pollution Crackdown

Megalith

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China has implemented an unprecedented pollution crackdown in recent months as the country shuts down tens of thousands of factories. The effort is part of a national effort to address China's infamous pollution and has affected wide swaths of China's manufacturing sector. In total, it is estimated that 40 percent of all China's factories have been shut down at some point in order to be inspected by environmental bureau officials.

As a result of these inspections over 80,000 factories have been hit with fines and criminal offenses as a result of their emissions. Safety officials have been moving from province to province (30 in total so far) shutting down factories as well as electricity and gas as they inspect the factories for meeting emissions requirements. This has resulted in late and missed orders, increased costs, and could ultimately result in higher prices on US shelves.
 
Good for them. And if the price of something you buy goes up because of this, know that you were part of the problem.
 
But the economy and jobs.......to some public health and this fake global warming isn't a concern.
 
When I was in Guangzhou about a decade ago, all the factories would just pollute at night. My driver said there are rules about pollution during the day but they aren't enforced at night when nobody can see. I wonder if it's still the same today.
 
Number of state owned factories shut down vs....

Still if you are state owned, maybe you were required to give a crap, and were good to go or updated from the start.

And there are 33 provinces, and 30 have been inspected, so its kinda true that 40% of china has been shut down, unless 20-30% of the factories are in the 3 that are left.
 
They can pollute themselves into oblivion since there are so many of them. I care more for the environment and wildlife. Have you ever heard about Four Pests Campaign in China? You can't really reason with people like that...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Pests_Campaign

Wow.

Regulations are need, even right here at home in the USA. We should never trade our environment for jobs in dying industries.
We are proud of our country and land so we need to take care of it, not poison it. There's only one US. 330M people can't pick up and settle somewhere else.

I haven't drank from the tap since the 90s.
 
Wow.

Regulations are need, even right here at home in the USA. We should never trade our environment for jobs in dying industries.
We are proud of our country and land so we need to take care of it, not poison it. There's only one US. 330M people can't pick up and settle somewhere else.

Well...we can. Plenty of room left in Canada.
 
The Chinese economic-growth powerhouse was fuelled by an all-out assault on the environment, eh? Who could've seen this coming? Other than the people living by The Lake Formerly Known as The Aral Sea, that is.
 
But ma capitalism!
Ha Ha. Hardly. Chinese businesses are either wholly or partially owned by the state. The oldest, biggest, and most polluting factories are almost all completely state run enterprises. This is the crux of the problem. When everybody owns something, nobody feels responsible for it.
 
Ha Ha. Hardly. Chinese businesses are either wholly or partially owned by the state. The oldest, biggest, and most polluting factories are almost all completely state run enterprises. This is the crux of the problem. When everybody owns something, nobody feels responsible for it.

What's America's problem with cleaning up then? The vast majority of companies are not wholly or partially state owned...
 
China was taking all the recyclables from the U.S. Cardboard, glass , plastic etc. They have now stated we are done, we buy NO MORE keep your trash. So all the stuff we put in to the recycle bins now goes into our land fills. The dump does generate a lot of methane. I guess if we would use some of that to generate electricity it might help.

In Oregon we have one county that has an emission free incinerator and the output is electricity. (Marion County) It works very well but is expensive to maintain. Maybe the Chi Coms should start working on something like that. Maybe we should be building more incinerators and improving the design. Better than a windmill, I think so at least you don't have to shut it down when the wind exceeds 50 mph. Better than solar panels, which on a good day and clean panels might be 19 to 20% efficient. Humm, speculation on my part.

Did you know it is dark out most of the night?
 
In Oregon we have one county that has an emission free incinerator and the output is electricity. (Marion County) It works very well but is expensive to maintain.

I found this. Sounds interesting and perhaps ALL other waste landfills should become power plants. AND they recycle the metals that don't burn. If they can control the smoke/ash output, which the doc says they can somehow, this is great.

http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/ES/disposal/Pages/mcwef.aspx

Reminds me of the plasma trash incinerators I read about 10+ years ago that haven't materialized because they cost a fortune.
 
does not exactly say what size are these factories. (50 workers is the cut off?) Workshops would be more appropriate for some , i suppose.
 
More like "40% of China’s factory owners haven't paid enough in bribes".
 
I found this. Sounds interesting and perhaps ALL other waste landfills should become power plants. AND they recycle the metals that don't burn. If they can control the smoke/ash output, which the doc says they can somehow, this is great.

http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/ES/disposal/Pages/mcwef.aspx

Reminds me of the plasma trash incinerators I read about 10+ years ago that haven't materialized because they cost a fortune.

Thank stupid environmentalists for pushing against trash burning power plants. It's not the burning part they have an issue with, it's the fact that it's trash. They're pushing for recycling or some shit, not burning the trash.

You can't win with stupid environmentalists. They want clean power, yet don't want any of the technologies that would provide clean/cleaner power.
 
Most tap water is cleaner and better policed than bottled water.

Not sure if many American companies compete with Chinese factories, but this may benefit the US.

A lot of heavy metals/minerals are in big city water. If I was out in a more rural area I would trust it more.
 
A lot of heavy metals/minerals are in big city water. If I was out in a more rural area I would trust it more.
You could always install a reverse osmosis system for your drinking water too, still would be way cheaper than bottled water over a very short time.
 
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I love how people who have no idea jump right to blaming capitalism and calling for regulation....Without having any idea that almost all power plants and main polluters are ALL state owned. They are very outdated plants and people have called for changes, but they are government controlled and funded, so the people can't do anything and have no other options. The government also admits it does not even meet it's own environmental rules and laws that the private businesses do.
 
Most tap water is cleaner and better policed than bottled water.

"Most" being the key word. I've lived in a lot of places, and usually people badmouth the tapwater, but Dallas tap water is truly foul, especially in spring when the storms churn up the lakes. You have to run it through a filter--twice--to make it not taste horrible.
 
"Most" being the key word. I've lived in a lot of places, and usually people badmouth the tapwater, but Dallas tap water is truly foul, especially in spring when the storms churn up the lakes. You have to run it through a filter--twice--to make it not taste horrible.

Plano tap water is like that. I guess it depends on what part of Dallas you live in. The city spent a lot of money on large scale reverse osmosis treatment plants but I don't think they ever finished the project so not all areas get the "nice" tap water. My friend's house by Lakewood has awesome tap water, it's crystal clear and tastes like bottled/filtered. Meanwhile my tap water in Plano in the summer tastes like dirty pool water, a nice blend of chlorine and dirt/mud.

However I lived in Lubbock, TX in the low 90's and that was the skankiest tap water I've ever consumed short of Mexico. It was thick and grey and tasted like chalk or something. The ice cubes (good for keeping beer cold, but don't put it IN your drink) were solid grey cubes. Who knows, maybe all that has changed in the last 25 years. But I bought a LOT of jugs of water when I lived there. You couldn't use a Brita filter, it would destroy the filter in just a couple days.
 
You could always install a reverse osmosis system for your drinking water too, still would be way cheaper than bottled water over a very short time.

Ya, just find a good water filtration system. Be it on the tap, gravity filtering, etc. The Aquasana AQ-4000 is actually pretty good one. Counter top system that meets NSF 401, 42, 53, and P473 standards. $50 for it and it just attachs to the tap and sits on your counter. $50 for replacement filters. Filters are good for 450 gallons. 22 cents a gallon initial investment, then 11 cents a gallon with replacement filters.

http://www.nsf.org/services/by-indu...esidential-drinking-water-treatment-standards
 
Plano tap water is like that. I guess it depends on what part of Dallas you live in. The city spent a lot of money on large scale reverse osmosis treatment plants but I don't think they ever finished the project so not all areas get the "nice" tap water. My friend's house by Lakewood has awesome tap water, it's crystal clear and tastes like bottled/filtered. Meanwhile my tap water in Plano in the summer tastes like dirty pool water, a nice blend of chlorine and dirt/mud.

However I lived in Lubbock, TX in the low 90's and that was the skankiest tap water I've ever consumed short of Mexico. It was thick and grey and tasted like chalk or something. The ice cubes (good for keeping beer cold, but don't put it IN your drink) were solid grey cubes. Who knows, maybe all that has changed in the last 25 years. But I bought a LOT of jugs of water when I lived there. You couldn't use a Brita filter, it would destroy the filter in just a couple days.

Treatment plants have to meet EPA testing, but they test what leaves the plant. I doubt they test at different endpoints, when it arrives through the water lines. So if the plumbing in the city is old, it can end up pretty shitty by the time it comes out the tap in your house. House plumbing will also have an affect. They should really test at main junction points throughout the city, if they don't already do so.
 
What's America's problem with cleaning up then? The vast majority of companies are not wholly or partially state owned...
They are owned by no face random investment funds and a gazillion low-end investors who barely pay attention. Same end result.
 
oh yeah...while the self-proclaimed civilized democratic countries in the "west" are debating about standardized banana bends and "how we should all get along" and "islam is the religion of peace"

with monstruous bureaucrazy costing taxpayers billions of "insert fav currency here" , the pragmatic chinese are powering on giving about 1 fuck about anything and I'm sure will be the pinnacle of civilization before some dumbfuck in the white house (future or present) decides "if we ain't the best fuck the rest" and end it all.

Didn't read article. Don't care.
 
What's America's problem with cleaning up then? The vast majority of companies are not wholly or partially state owned...
America has done a fantastic job of cleaning up. We have the cleanest air, water, and soil out of all the industrialized nations in the world.
 
Ya, just find a good water filtration system. Be it on the tap, gravity filtering, etc. The Aquasana AQ-4000 is actually pretty good one. Counter top system that meets NSF 401, 42, 53, and P473 standards. $50 for it and it just attachs to the tap and sits on your counter. $50 for replacement filters. Filters are good for 450 gallons. 22 cents a gallon initial investment, then 11 cents a gallon with replacement filters.

http://www.nsf.org/services/by-indu...esidential-drinking-water-treatment-standards
I use the Kinetico system and it works very well. It's more expensive than the systems you mentioned, but it delivers up to 5 gallons a day of clean water, and I only have to replace the filters about every 18 months or so. Highly recommended.
 
The steel/oil/coal factories are the huge polluters, and are state owned, they might not be touched by this.
True china all the time has these greenwashing campaigns that in law or by name are suppose to do something but it ends up being ignored after 2 months.

Although china is really honestly trying to crack down on smog at least because it's causing too many problems and they probably want the populace to shut up about it.
 
America has done a fantastic job of cleaning up. We have the cleanest air, water, and soil out of all the industrialized nations in the world.

And subsidizing Fossil fuels while other industrialized Nations are phasing them out. Pulling out of the Paris agreement. Fracking is destroying fresh water.
 
And subsidizing Fossil fuels while other industrialized Nations are phasing them out. Pulling out of the Paris agreement. Fracking is destroying fresh water.

Thankfully, while being the cleanest, we still have plenty of room to improve.
 
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