3d scanner with quallity enough for printing

Discussion in '3D Printers & Projects' started by Rabinovic, Feb 1, 2018.

  1. Rabinovic

    Rabinovic n00bie

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    I'm thinking of buying a 3d scanner, due to constructing spare parts for my staff in CADs is not the fastest and accurate way.
    Could anyone recommend me something?
     
  2. Supercharged_Z06

    Supercharged_Z06 [H]ard|Gawd

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    What kind of parts? What size? What are they for? You printing dildos or what? If you aren't all that worried as to part accuracy or the quality of the scans, then there are some options in the $500-$1000 realm, but be prepared for lots of setup hassle, operating headaches, and crap software. Reviews for sub $500 3D scanners all typically state they suck. With lower end hardware/software, scans will often come with anomalies/artifacts that will need to be cleaned up in the model after scanning. Professional grade 3D scanners (smaller ones) start at around $6k even for entry level models and then rocket up from there to the $20-$30K range... Something like this for example is $9.8K: https://www.artec3d.com/portable-3d-scanners/artec-eva-lite (And that does not include the $600 base or $1200 deluxe software you'll need to go with it.) You might just want to stick to CAD and buy better staff. :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
  3. rhansen5_99

    rhansen5_99 [H]ard|Gawd

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    3D Systems has a pretty good scanner in the Capture, https://www.3dsystems.com/3d-scanners/geomagic-capture but they are not cheap (15k ish), also a scanner like this with lasers has trouble with reflective surfaces, so you have to dust something like a motherboard in baby powder to get a good scan. I guess I will reiterate the above question as to what kind of stuff, how big and what quality you are needing scan data in. For example you could grab a xbox one kinect and get fairly decent scan data on the cheap if you were wanting to mess with it. Check out https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/3d-print/scanning-with-kinect ... and you can pick up kinects for sub $30 maybe a little for the usb3 / power adapters.
     
  4. Rabinovic

    Rabinovic n00bie

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    Supercharged_Z06, Oh! I'm sorry, of cause i mean stuff like non human objects, cars, furniture, etc. Not staff - people.
     
  5. rhansen5_99

    rhansen5_99 [H]ard|Gawd

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    Haha faro has a cool arm scanner not sure on price https://www.faro.com, and I think you can pump data to geomagic control or design x to get solid models out of the data, and then import into your CAD package.
     
  6. Supercharged_Z06

    Supercharged_Z06 [H]ard|Gawd

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    Um... Wut? What I meant by buy better staff is to invest in some better talent as to CAD/CAM designers rather than blow a small fortune on scanning hardware that will probably be obsolete in a few years.
     
  7. Rabinovic

    Rabinovic n00bie

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    I looked through all the links you gave me, discussed it with my team and we decided, that we definitely need a 3d scanner.

    I'm pretty sure it will be Space Spider by Artec. https://www.artec3d.com/portable-3d-scanners/artec-spider
    Yes the price is bugger than some of the alternatives, but it's handheld and provides exact quality we need.
    Anyway thank you all for useful advises.
     
  8. Supercharged_Z06

    Supercharged_Z06 [H]ard|Gawd

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    That hardware/software combo is going to run ~$26K. Hope it does what you need it to and best of luck!
     
  9. Mr. Baz

    Mr. Baz 2[H]4U

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    With the crazy expense of a hardware-based 3D scanner, think of what your tolerances absolutely have to be.

    Obviously, the free stuff gives you pretty crappy meshes that aren't useful for anything more than playing around.

    Now, Photoscan by AGISoft is pretty darn good. You use any standard camera (heck, I've used the camera on my smartphone) to take oodles of pictures from every angle imagineable. You then allow the software to stitch together a composite. It then generates a point cloud. Then, it produces a 3D mesh. This is a simplification of the process, obviously. I havefound that Photoscan can give you VERY good results with outstanding tolerance. Photoscan isn't free, nor cheap, but it is way better competitively priced compared to hardware-based scanners.

    This same software has been used by archeologists to preserve historic structures/monuments/statues/etc. You can also use Photoscan 3D with aerial pictures to give you a heightmap. Think of crazy-resolution Google Earth.
     
  10. Mr. Baz

    Mr. Baz 2[H]4U

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    No engineer worth his/her salt would ever say this. Reverse engineering something using a quality process in a CAD program is WAY more accurate than nearly any 3D scan. 3D scanning is used for verification of design/production or manufacture. Yes, 3D scanning can also be used to reproduce something that is no longer made and could potentially be quite difficult to reverse engineer, but it isn't perfect. A well trained engineer with the proper tools can reverse engineer any part more accurately than a 3D scanner can do.

    Note: Most manufacturing tolerance verifications are done by a touch probe, not 3D scanning.

    If you just want to scan random stuff to 3D print or include in a 3D rendering, almost any of the free stuff will get you close. Photoscan will get you near-engineering-level tolerances if done right. Unless you are designing to-spec replacement parts of a brake caliper of a high-end supercar, you don't need a $26k scanner.
     
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  11. Rabinovic

    Rabinovic n00bie

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    3d scanning is used for reverse engenering with CAD software of cause. But with the scanner you don't need to perform tons of measurments to get enough data to make a proper CAD model. with the scanner you get an accurate model which is used as a base for making final model instead of a huge list of figures.
     
  12. Mr. Baz

    Mr. Baz 2[H]4U

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    We still don't know what your end-game is. Is it 3D printing? You mentioned 3D scanning furniture...hardly something that requires precision. 3D scanning cars. What cars? Car parts or just the overall outter 'shell?'
     
  13. Spidey329

    Spidey329 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    This is really going to come down to what the end game is. Are these quick one-offs? Are you going to make lots of production runs with what you scan? Just scanning for renderering? Scanning to design accessories/add-on components? Need volume, quality, portability, or all of the above?

    Obviously, if it's a production run product for manufacturing, it should be done properly in CAD to give everyone in the pipeline flexibility (from tooling to value engineering). If you're just scanning for renderering or game models, you might be able to get by with a cheaper scanner. The advantage of a 3D scanner there is the more expensive ones pick up the necessary values for great PBR rendering and can provide the texture.

    On the cheap, you can get great results (after tinkering) with a DSLR (you can use any camera, but might as well use a good quality one) and some open source software. But the workflow is a tad slower. And don't let those crazy bad player models NBC did for the Superbowl fool you, they didn't know what they were doing (apparently).
     
  14. entplex

    entplex n00bie

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    I'd also take a look at the NextEngine scanner, it's at a bit of a unique price point to quality ratio for someone not wanting to invest in serious equipment. ~$3k and gives pretty good scans. You'll still need to clean models up, but a good starting place.